The condensed, pressurized, and still usually somewhat hot liquid refrigerant is next routed through an expansion valve (often nothing more than a pinhole in the system's copper tubing) where it undergoes an abrupt reduction in pressure. That pressure reduction results in flash evaporation of a part of the liquid refrigerant, greatly lowering its temperature. The cold refrigerant is then routed through the evaporator. A fan blows the interior warm air (which is to be cooled) across the evaporator, causing the liquid part of the cold refrigerant mixture to evaporate as well, further lowering the temperature. The warm air is therefore cooled and is pumped by an exhaust fan/ blower into the room. To complete the refrigeration cycle, the refrigerant vapor is routed back into the compressor. In order for the process to have any efficiency, the cooling/evaporative portion of the system must be separated by some kind of physical barrier from the heating/condensing portion, and each portion must have its own fan to circulate its own "kind" of air (either the hot air or the cool air).
Circulating refrigerant vapor enters the compressor, where its pressure and temperature are increased. The hot, compressed refrigerant vapor is now at a temperature and pressure at which it can be condensed and is routed through a condenser. Here it is cooled by air flowing across the condenser coils and condensed into a liquid. Thus, the circulating refrigerant removes heat from the system and the heat is carried away by the air. The removal of this heat can be greatly augmented by pouring water over the condenser coils, making it much cooler when it hits the expansion valve.
Kabran Air Conditioning & Heating is the first choice for heating and air conditioning on the Florida Space Coast! In addition to providing exceptional HVAC service, repair and installation, we also offer great deals and savings for our customers across Cocoa Beach FL, Satellite Beach FL, Cape Canaveral FL, Rockledge FL, Melbourne FL, Merritt Island FL, Viera FL, Indian Harbour Beach FL. Join our Cool Club to enjoy exclusive, member-only offers. Visit our special offers page today to see what we’re currently offering, and contact Kabran Air Conditioning & Heating for affordable heating and AC service in Cocoa Beach.
In the most general sense, air conditioning can refer to any form of technology that modifies the condition of air (heating, (de-) humidification, cooling, cleaning, ventilation, or air movement). In common usage, though, "air conditioning" refers to systems which cool air. In construction, a complete system of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning is referred to as HVAC.[3]
We are so happy with the service and the unit installed. Carlos, the sales representative, was very attentive to our needs at the time. He knew exactly what we needed for our a/c concerns. Brandon Hayword, the a/c installer was amazing. I have never seen a technician so meticulous. Every detail was attended to. Poor guy worked from morning till 4:00 Am the next day. Never heard a complaint or wanted to go home and call it a night. Again, thank-you for the great service.
HVAC repair technicians are properly qualified to take care of anything that relates to installing, maintaining or repairing your heating, air conditioning and refrigeration systems. Our professionals have gone through rigorous training and certification and all our technicians and equipment installers are NATE-certified, which involves demanding testing and indicates a solid understanding of the industry.
Natural gas furnaces operate similarly to the above, using a pilot light to ignite the burners and heat up the air. Also similar to propane gas, your average repair costs for a natural gas furnace will range anywhere from $125 for small repairs to $1,200 if you have to replace the entire heat exchanger. The difference between both options is not necessarily the actual furnace, but the type of gas used to burn through it and heat your home. As a result, the repair costs tend to be close to identical.

Here at Brothers Plumbing, Heating, and Electric, we have a Home Care Club that provides members with many benefits. These benefits include: 2 year warranty on all work (drain work is excluded), transferable club membership, no “show up” fees, priority service, 10% discount on repairs, quarterly newsletters, carefree scheduling (we will contact you and remind you when you need service), 2 free furnace/air conditioner filter changes, exclusive coupons, quarterly drawings, 4 on-going safety checks, and a 100% satisfaction guarantee. So if you’d like to join our Home Care Club, then give us a call or click here today.

If your air conditioning is blowing warm air—or not working at all—it's time to call in the experts. After all, we're not just talking about an uncomfortable afternoon on a hot day: we're talking about your happiness at home, and a problem that may cause extensive damage to your system if not addressed quickly. That's why it's smart to catch problems early before they become expensive to address.
Since the 1980s, manufacturers of HVAC equipment have been making an effort to make the systems they manufacture more efficient. This was originally driven by rising energy costs, and has more recently been driven by increased awareness of environmental issues. Additionally, improvements to the HVAC system efficiency can also help increase occupant health and productivity.[24] In the US, the EPA has imposed tighter restrictions over the years. There are several methods for making HVAC systems more efficient.
Turn off the gas supply valve, typically located by your gas meter on the gas inlet pipe. Turn off the gas by rotating the valve one quarter turn with an adjustable wrench. When the gas is off,  the valve’s oblong stem points perpendicular to the inlet pipe. Then call your gas utility or the fire department from a remote location. Do not return to your home until you know it is safe.

In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]

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