Air ducts come in two forms: cool air ducts (also known as “return ducts”) and warm air ducts (also known as “supply ducts”). Warm air from the furnace enters the home through the warm air registers. No more than 20: of these warm air ducts and registers should ever be closed off – this hinders air flow and could result in the overheating of the heat exchanger, causing costly damage to you home heating system.
Precision’s technicians are all NATE certified. This is the highest certification in the air conditioning industry. With that, we can take pride in saying that we provide the best AC repair Phoenix residents can get. Our technicians are thoroughly screened and tested before they begin work on your home. Our AC technicians provide top-notch Phoenix air conditioning repair, and proof of that is their ability to repair most every brand of HVAC equipment. These brands include Trane, Bryant, Ruud, Goodman, Amana, Precision, Armstrong, Carrier, Coleman, Honeywell, Janitrol, Lennox, Payne, Rheem, York, Goettl, American Standard along with many more.

The belt should slip right into place. If it seems to be too tight or difficult to set in place, it may be necessary to adjust the motor mount to provide more slack. Then you can re-tighten the tension once the belt is in place. Check the manufacturer’s specifications for proper tension—in most cases, the belt should deflect about an inch when you press down on it.

Because an air conditioner moves heat between the indoor coil and the outdoor coil, both must be kept clean. This means that, in addition to replacing the air filter at the evaporator coil, it is also necessary to regularly clean the condenser coil. Failure to keep the condenser clean will eventually result in harm to the compressor, because the condenser coil is responsible for discharging both the indoor heat (as picked up by the evaporator) and the heat generated by the electric motor driving the compressor.
Central, "all-air" air-conditioning systems (or package systems) with a combined outdoor condenser/evaporator unit are often installed in North American residences, offices, and public buildings, but are difficult to retrofit (install in a building that was not designed to receive it) because of the bulky air ducts required. (Minisplit ductless systems are used in these situations.) Outside of North America, packaged systems are only used in limited applications involving large indoor space such as stadiums, theatres or exhibition halls.
Close all the windows in the house, turn off all the fans and exhaust fans, and shut off the furnace. Light some incense and walk slowly around the outer walls of the house. Anywhere you notice the smoke blowing away from something or being sucked toward something, there’s probably an air leak. Now that you’ve found it, seal it! Here’s how. Here are more ways to improve energy efficiency in your home.
The belt should slip right into place. If it seems to be too tight or difficult to set in place, it may be necessary to adjust the motor mount to provide more slack. Then you can re-tighten the tension once the belt is in place. Check the manufacturer’s specifications for proper tension—in most cases, the belt should deflect about an inch when you press down on it.

We want to compliment your fine sales and installation team. They are outstanding. Carlos, your sales rep., was highly informative. We reviewed our needs and we ultimately chose the Trane XV-18 variable speed system. Carlos did not try to up sell us with things that we did not need but he did help us choose the correct upgraded filter and UV light that we wanted. We told Carlos that our research indicated that the quality of the installation of the unit was at least as important as the unit itself, and Carlos agreed. Carlos pointed out that new proper sized duct work and copper wiring would be required for a correct installation, and that we needed to add two more returns. We asked if more returns were needed and Carlos said that would not be cost effective. That was great to hear. Carlos assured us that the installation team of Willie and Gary, both lead installers, would be used. They were both superb. They came on time and worked for 12 and 1/2 hours. It was a 93 degree day so the heat in the attic was intense. We kept telling them to take a break but they continued to work up there in what must have been 130+ temperatures. They were amazing! They were neat and cleaned up any mess they made. They patiently answered all of our many questions and gave us helpful tips. They were truly professional in all respects. We also note that Stacy, Angie and Karen of your office staff were each courteous, accommodating and efficient. They helped things to go smoothly. Carlos, Gary, Stacy, Angie, Willie and Karen are each great assets to your company. We would be comfortable recommending that team of people to anyone! Ken and Kathy Luban
We were visiting our Arizona home from New York, when on one of the hottest days in August the air conditioning was not working. We called Precision & James Shelton worked to get the air up & running in no time. He was courteous & sympathetic, working hard to repair our central air…we have a warranty & Precision stands behind their work, they are available 24/7… Thank you!
The liquid refrigerant is returned to another heat exchanger where it is allowed to evaporate, hence the heat exchanger is often called an evaporating coil or evaporator. As the liquid refrigerant evaporates it absorbs energy (heat) from the inside air, returns to the compressor, and repeats the cycle. In the process, heat is absorbed from indoors and transferred outdoors, resulting in cooling of the building.
Modern Air Solutions provides the skilled and dedicated services to maintain a healthier, more comfortable indoor residential or commercial space, while saving you time and money.  Since first opening our doors in 2007, we’ve built and continue a reputation for a job well done across Aurora, Oswego, Montgomery, Bristol & Plainfield, IL. We’ve assembled a team of licensed, NATE-certified, and factory trained specialists, equipped with the leading-edge tools and technology, to quickly and accurately resolve any challenge.
Whole-house fans have helped cool homes for a century. The basic design is simple: An attic-mounted fan pushes hot air out through attic vents and draws cooler, outside air in through open doors and windows. This rapid air exchange—large fans can purge a house of hot air in two to three minutes—not only removes built-up heat but also creates a pleasant breeze.
Designed to improve manufacturing process control in a printing plant, Carrier's invention controlled not only temperature but also humidity. Carrier used his knowledge of the heating of objects with steam and reversed the process. Instead of sending air through hot coils, he sent it through cold coils (filled with cold water). The air was cooled, and thereby the amount of moisture in the air could be controlled, which in turn made the humidity in the room controllable. The controlled temperature and humidity helped maintain consistent paper dimensions and ink alignment. Later, Carrier's technology was applied to increase productivity in the workplace, and The Carrier Air Conditioning Company of America was formed to meet rising demand. Over time, air conditioning came to be used to improve comfort in homes and automobiles as well. Residential sales expanded dramatically in the 1950s.[citation needed]
Air conditioner inverter Air door Air filter Air handler Air ionizer Air-mixing plenum Air purifier Air source heat pumps Automatic balancing valve Back boiler Barrier pipe Blast damper Boiler Centrifugal fan Ceramic heater Chiller Condensate pump Condenser Condensing boiler Convection heater Cooling tower Damper Dehumidifier Duct Economizer Electrostatic precipitator Evaporative cooler Evaporator Exhaust hood Expansion tank Fan coil unit Fan heater Fire damper Fireplace Fireplace insert Freeze stat Flue Freon Fume hood Furnace Furnace room Gas compressor Gas heater Gasoline heater Geothermal heat pump Grease duct Grille Ground-coupled heat exchanger Heat exchanger Heat pipe Heat pump Heating film Heating system High efficiency glandless circulating pump High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) High pressure cut off switch Humidifier Infrared heater Inverter compressor Kerosene heater Louver Mechanical fan Mechanical room Oil heater Packaged terminal air conditioner Plenum space Pressurisation ductwork Process duct work Radiator Radiator reflector Recuperator Refrigerant Register Reversing valve Run-around coil Scroll compressor Solar chimney Solar-assisted heat pump Space heater Smoke exhaust ductwork Thermal expansion valve Thermal wheel Thermosiphon Thermostatic radiator valve Trickle vent Trombe wall Turning vanes Ultra-low particulate air (ULPA) Whole-house fan Windcatcher Wood-burning stove
Dichlorodifluoromethane (R-12) was the most common blend used in automobiles in the U.S. until 1994, when most designs changed to R-134A due to the ozone-depleting potential of R-12. R-11 and R-12 are no longer manufactured in the U.S. for this type of application, so the only source for air-conditioning repair purposes is the cleaned and purified gas recovered from other air conditioner systems. Several non-ozone-depleting refrigerants have been developed as alternatives, including R-410A. It was first commercially used by Carrier Corp. under the brand name Puron.[citation needed]
In the case of heated water or steam, piping is used to transport the heat to the rooms. Most modern hot water boiler heating systems have a circulator, which is a pump, to move hot water through the distribution system (as opposed to older gravity-fed systems). The heat can be transferred to the surrounding air using radiators, hot water coils (hydro-air), or other heat exchangers. The radiators may be mounted on walls or installed within the floor to produce floor heat.

The liquid refrigerant is returned to another heat exchanger where it is allowed to evaporate, hence the heat exchanger is often called an evaporating coil or evaporator. As the liquid refrigerant evaporates it absorbs energy (heat) from the inside air, returns to the compressor, and repeats the cycle. In the process, heat is absorbed from indoors and transferred outdoors, resulting in cooling of the building.
Window unit air conditioners are installed in an open window. The interior air is cooled as a fan blows it over the evaporator. On the exterior the heat drawn from the interior is dissipated into the environment as a second fan blows outside air over the condenser. A large house or building may have several such units, allowing each room to be cooled separately.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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