An annual inspection of your unit can ensure that the various potential problems mentioned above are detected early, and before they require complete replacement. During this inspection, for instance, a professional might find small cracks in your heat exchanger or a faulty seal in your blower motor. Some manufacturer's warranties even require these annual inspections to maintain validity. Typically, your furnace inspection will cost between $80 and $150 depending on the area in which you live and the professional you work with.
HVAC equipment is estimated to last about 15 to 20 years. Yet over the years, parts go out and need to be repaired. Heat sensors, exchangers, and ducts can become worn out. Air conditioning motors may need repairing from time to time. For repairs to your heating and air conditioning systems, and even general maintenance, let HomeAdvisor help. Enter your zip code and let us connect you with prescreened HVAC repair services near you.
Because an air conditioner moves heat between the indoor coil and the outdoor coil, both must be kept clean. This means that, in addition to replacing the air filter at the evaporator coil, it is also necessary to regularly clean the condenser coil. Failure to keep the condenser clean will eventually result in harm to the compressor, because the condenser coil is responsible for discharging both the indoor heat (as picked up by the evaporator) and the heat generated by the electric motor driving the compressor.
We take great pride in our crew, choosing the best and brightest to represent R.S. Andrews in the face of an emergency. Our HVAC contractors boast not only unparalleled skill but also a friendly and professional demeanor. All of our work comes completely guaranteed, and we won’t rest until your emergency has been resolved to your full satisfaction!

*We work on all brands: Adams, Aire-Flo, Amana, Arcoaire, Armstrong, Beutler, Bryant, Carrier, Centurion, Coleman, Comfortmaker, Cozy, Daikin, Day & Night, Dayton, Ducane, Emerson, Empire, Evcon, Fedders, Friedrich, Frigidaire, Fujitsu, Gaffers & Statler, General Electric, Gibson, Goldstar, Goodman, GMC, Haier, Heil, Honeywell, Intertherm, Janitrol, Kenmore, Lennox, Luxaire, Maytag, Mitsubishi, Payne, Rheem, Ruud, Samsung, Sanyo, Sears, Sharp, Spartan, Tappan, Tempstar, Thermal Solutions, Trane, Utica, Weatherking, Westinghouse, Whirlpool, Williams, York, and Zephyr.


Recent Review: Metro Service was amazing. They came out on Saturday and secured the gas to a failing furnace to insure our safety. They came out on Monday and had the new furnace installed and operating within less than 4 hours. Polite, professional, meticulous and 35% lower than their competitors. I will be using them for all of my HVAC needs in the future.
Your furnace's flame sensor is essentially a safety mechanism. As a thin metallic rod in front of the flame inside the unit, it's sole purpose is to confirm that your gas valves only open when a flame actually exists to burn that gas. When the flame sensor stop working, on the other hand, gas leaks can occur. To repair your furnace's flame sensor, expect to spend between $80 and $250. Even a full replacement of this part typically does not go above that range.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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