Allow our experts to help with any of your heating and cooling needs or questions. Our wide array of expertise and background will benefit you and your home, whether you are considering a replacement system or evaluating your whole system to check for areas of improvement. We can help you reach your optimum indoor comfort. Give us a ring at 866-397-3787 or request an appointment online.
Some systems include an "economizer mode", which is sometimes called a "free-cooling mode". When economizing, the control system will open (fully or partially) the outside air damper and close (fully or partially) the return air damper. This will cause fresh, outside air to be supplied to the system. When the outside air is cooler than the demanded cool air, this will allow the demand to be met without using the mechanical supply of cooling (typically chilled water or a direct expansion "DX" unit), thus saving energy. The control system can compare the temperature of the outside air vs. return air, or it can compare the enthalpy of the air, as is frequently done in climates where humidity is more of an issue. In both cases, the outside air must be less energetic than the return air for the system to enter the economizer mode.
As a Carrier Factory Authorized Dealer, M and M, Heating & Cooling, Plumbing & Electrical is qualified to properly size and install the most technologically advanced and well-regarded heating, cooling, and air quality products on the market today. Our team is NATE-certified, factory trained, EPA certified, and regularly updated, ensuring the right solution to any challenge.

I'm looking about spanning 15' for a gazebo. trying to figure out what dimension beams I need. The Gazebo will be 15'x10'. How big will the beams have to be. at 1/2 the distance on 15' I will have a perpendicular beam running to carry 2x4's running parallel to 15' beam edge. I live in California in there with be no roofing material.. I will be using redwood for lumber Thanks
Many disconnect blocks contain two cartridge fuses. Check them before you proceed with repairs (Photo 3). A blown fuse is a sign of a failing part inside the condensing unit. So don’t just replace it and think you’ve solved the problem. Instead, replace the parts we show here. Then install new fuses and fire up the unit. If it blows again, call a pro—you’ve got more serious issues.
There was an unidentified beeping sound which I thought was coming from my indoor HVAC unit. The technician patiently spoke to me over the phone and we discovered that it was not the HVAC that was making the noise. The technician was extraordinarily helpful and polite as we spoke and he saved me a few hundred dollars since he helped me over the phone and didn't have to make an emergency visit. HVAC Unlimited is our "go to" company for all our heating and cooling needs!

Your HVAC professional can also help you verify that your system is properly matched by providing you with an AHRI Certificate of Certified Product Performance upon request. The certificate verifies that the outdoor unit (condenser) and the indoor unit (evaporator) combination has been certified as a matched system by the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI). For higher efficiency systems, this certification may help you obtain a rebate from your utility or local municipality if you have to replace your unit in whole or in part. Not all areas offer a rebate, but your technician will likely be able to provide information about the certification process. Fees for performing this certification vary, but generally are relatively inexpensive.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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