To keep your furnace in good working order it’s important to have it regularly cleaned. The national average furnace cleaning cost ranges from $60 to $80, though prices can vary greatly based on where you live in the country and what your furnace maintenance includes. An HVAC company may have different rates for different levels of furnace maintenance. For example,one company may offer general furnace maintenance for $79 and advanced maintenance for $138. Another company may offer a 38-point maintenance check for $89 and a 64-point maintenance check for $178. According to Energy.gov, a standard furnace cleaning and maintenance visit can include:

We understand having problems with your air conditioning system - can be frustrating and uncomfortable. That's why Gator Air Conditioning only employs background checked, drug tested, highly trained and certified technicians. And we are so confident in their skill to correctly diagnosis and complete your Air Conditioner repair that we cover them with our Fixed Right Guarantee. Our Comfort Advisors come from the industry with the technical expertise needed to ensure the air conditioning systems we quote will be sized right to maximize performance. We employ the best air conditioner installers in Bradenton, FL to ensure your air conditioning system will be installed right to meet or exceed manufacturer recommendations. For your peace of mind, our Installation Guarantees cover more than just the equipment… we also cover your money, time, our workmanship, and your satisfaction.
Repairs—If something appears to be not working right with your heating and cooling, a professional will examine the whole health of your system. It’s easy to hop on the internet and research information to find our own conclusions, but there could be an additional component or reason why your system isn’t working properly that isn’t clear or recognizable. Consider our own health concerns—you might check out your symptoms online to try and draw your conclusions, but it’s always best to make an appointment with a doctor to receive an expert opinion.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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