Even with the best air conditioning repair service Phoenix can offer, an AC unit that has reached the end of its shelf life must be replaced. If you are ready to upgrade or replace that aging system, call us now for a free estimate, or check out our AC Unit Replacement section. In addition to offering our own Precision Line with the best warranty available in the industry, we also partner with industry leaders to offer the highest quality equipment at the best possible price, and we personally stand behind all of our new equipment installations.
Air changes per hour Bake-out Building envelope Convection Dilution Domestic energy consumption Enthalpy Fluid dynamics Gas compressor Heat pump and refrigeration cycle Heat transfer Humidity Infiltration Latent heat Noise control Outgassing Particulates Psychrometrics Sensible heat Stack effect Thermal comfort Thermal destratification Thermal mass Thermodynamics Vapour pressure of water
It’s a rare occasion for a problem to arise with your heating or cooling equipment at a convenient time. In fact, we’re not even certain such a time exists! That’s why the team at HVAC & Plumbing Unlimited stands ready to provide complete emergency heating and cooling repairs. No matter the time of day or the day itself, we can be on the way and ready to provide prompt, cost-efficient services to our Alexandria clients.*
The fan limit switch controls the furnace blower. The fan limit switch has three settings: “Fan On”, “Fan Off”, and “Limit”. In the “Fan Off” setting, the blower will only operate if there is warm air in the plenum to prevent cool air from blowing into the home. The “Fan On” setting will keep the blower operating even after the burner has shutdown, making sure that all of the hot air produced is circulated. The “Limit” setting is a safety control that will turn the burner off in the rare event that the air in the warm air plenum reaches an unsafe temperature. This may be the case if ducts are blocked or if the system controls are malfunctioning.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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