A number of other variables can influence your decision on whether to repair or replace your furnace, as well. In addition to cost and brand, consider the expected lifetime of your furnace. If it is more than 15 years old, it might make more sense to invest in a new unit even if it costs more than simply repairing the current problem. Long-term costs also play into the equation. For example, your new furnace may be more energy efficient than the current unit. Even though you will pay more for the actual installation, you might be able to make back your investment through lower energy bills. To make your decision, consult with a reliable professional on what to do. In inspecting your furnace, they will be able to make an informed recommendation that looks not just to the next year, but years into the future. That way, you can make the best possible decision for your home and budget long-term.
The liquid refrigerant is returned to another heat exchanger where it is allowed to evaporate, hence the heat exchanger is often called an evaporating coil or evaporator. As the liquid refrigerant evaporates it absorbs energy (heat) from the inside air, returns to the compressor, and repeats the cycle. In the process, heat is absorbed from indoors and transferred outdoors, resulting in cooling of the building.
Our company is in the business of providing reliable and affordable residential and building maintenance services to help property owners preserve the aesthetic and functionality of their spaces. Our goal is to make sure that our clients will get the best service that will meet and exceed their satisfaction. The moment you book our services, you can guarantee that whatever maintenance issues you might have will be handled with utmost professionalism and credibility.
5) Check certifications. Many HVAC professionals belong to the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) or the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association (SMACNA). Both sites provide listings of HVAC contractors by area. Look for contractors whose technicians are certified by North American Technician Excellence (NATE) and partnered with ENERGY STAR.

A pinging or popping sound coming from the duct work can come from thermal expansion—the ductwork expanding and contracting as it heats and cools.  Or, air blowing past a loose flap of metal can make the sound. Track along the duct runs, listening for the sound. If you locate it, make a small dent in the sheet metal to provide a more rigid surface that’s less likely to move as it heats and cools.
Ground source, or geothermal, heat pumps are similar to ordinary heat pumps, but instead of transferring heat to or from outside air, they rely on the stable, even temperature of the earth to provide heating and air conditioning. Many regions experience seasonal temperature extremes, which would require large-capacity heating and cooling equipment to heat or cool buildings. For example, a conventional heat pump system used to heat a building in Montana's −70 °F (−57 °C) low temperature or cool a building in the highest temperature ever recorded in the US—134 °F (57 °C) in Death Valley, California, in 1913 would require a large amount of energy due to the extreme difference between inside and outside air temperatures. A few feet below the earth's surface, however, the ground remains at a relatively constant temperature. Utilizing this large source of relatively moderate temperature earth, a heating or cooling system's capacity can often be significantly reduced. Although ground temperatures vary according to latitude, at 6 feet (1.8 m) underground, temperatures generally only range from 45 to 75 °F (7 to 24 °C).
Put simply, any home that uses air pushed through ductwork for heating purposes takes advantage of forced air heating. In other words, this term refers not to your furnace, but to the delivery method of the heat throughout your home. Forced air heating is possible with electric or gas furnaces, or a heat pump. Any issues with this delivery system that aren't directly related to the furnace likely have to do with the duct work, which costs between $35 and $55 per linear square foot to repair, or the air handling unit.
Air conditioning can also be provided by a process called free cooling which uses pumps to circulate a coolant (typically water or a glycol mix) from a cold source, which in turn acts as a heat sink for the energy that is removed from the cooled space. Common storage media are deep aquifers or a natural underground rock mass accessed via a cluster of small-diameter boreholes, equipped with heat exchanger. Some systems with small storage capacity are hybrid systems, using free cooling early in the cooling season, and later employing a heat pump to chill the circulation coming from the storage. The heat pump is added because the temperature of the storage gradually increases during the cooling season, thereby declining its effectiveness.
Absorption heat pumps are a kind of air-source heat pump, but they do not depend on electricity to power them. Instead, gas, solar power, or heated water is used as a main power source. An absorption pump dissolves ammonia gas in water, which gives off heat. Next, the water and ammonia mixture is depressurized to induce boiling, and the ammonia is boiled off, which absorbs heat from the outdoor air.[citation needed]
The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers is a body that covers the essential Service (systems architecture) that allow buildings to operate. It includes the electrotechnical, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, refrigeration and plumbing industries. To train as a building services engineer, the academic requirements are GCSEs (A-C) / Standard Grades (1-3) in Maths and Science, which are important in measurements, planning and theory. Employers will often want a degree in a branch of engineering, such as building environment engineering, electrical engineering or mechanical engineering. To become a full member of CIBSE, and so also to be registered by the Engineering Council UK as a chartered engineer, engineers must also attain an Honours Degree and a master's degree in a relevant engineering subject.

Repairs—If something appears to be not working right with your heating and cooling, a professional will examine the whole health of your system. It’s easy to hop on the internet and research information to find our own conclusions, but there could be an additional component or reason why your system isn’t working properly that isn’t clear or recognizable. Consider our own health concerns—you might check out your symptoms online to try and draw your conclusions, but it’s always best to make an appointment with a doctor to receive an expert opinion.
The belt should slip right into place. If it seems to be too tight or difficult to set in place, it may be necessary to adjust the motor mount to provide more slack. Then you can re-tighten the tension once the belt is in place. Check the manufacturer’s specifications for proper tension—in most cases, the belt should deflect about an inch when you press down on it.
An electric furnace provides warmth by moving air over and through a series of coils. Ductwork and vents then distribute that air to the individual rooms in your home. Repair costs will depend on both the brand and the exact nature of the problem, but tend to be lower than some of the options above. That's because the units are small, and issues tend to be contained within the heating elements themselves. Expect to spend less than $300 on your electric furnace repair, depending on the exact problem.
We relocate frequently and one of the biggest hassles of relocating to new areas is finding reputable companies that send qualified technicians to perform work when you need it, whether for annual preventative maintenance or during a house emergency. We’ve been through the process several times and always dread researching and trying new companies. This was our first HVAC call here in northern Virginia. We are in new construction and chose not to use the builder’s sub-contractor for a technician call but looked through Carrier’s website for a local business. Jeremy Garner with HVAC Unlimited responded to our service request the morning following our call. I shadowed him performing work and he was patient while I peppered him with questions. He helped expand my HVAC knowledge in order to be a better property owner of our systems. He performed the work we thought was necessary, in a timely and professional manner, and gave us options for future annual maintenance. HVAC Unlimited is definitely on our list of go-to contractors.
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