Air conditioner inverter Air door Air filter Air handler Air ionizer Air-mixing plenum Air purifier Air source heat pumps Automatic balancing valve Back boiler Barrier pipe Blast damper Boiler Centrifugal fan Ceramic heater Chiller Condensate pump Condenser Condensing boiler Convection heater Cooling tower Damper Dehumidifier Duct Economizer Electrostatic precipitator Evaporative cooler Evaporator Exhaust hood Expansion tank Fan coil unit Fan heater Fire damper Fireplace Fireplace insert Freeze stat Flue Freon Fume hood Furnace Furnace room Gas compressor Gas heater Gasoline heater Geothermal heat pump Grease duct Grille Ground-coupled heat exchanger Heat exchanger Heat pipe Heat pump Heating film Heating system High efficiency glandless circulating pump High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) High pressure cut off switch Humidifier Infrared heater Inverter compressor Kerosene heater Louver Mechanical fan Mechanical room Oil heater Packaged terminal air conditioner Plenum space Pressurisation ductwork Process duct work Radiator Radiator reflector Recuperator Refrigerant Register Reversing valve Run-around coil Scroll compressor Solar chimney Solar-assisted heat pump Space heater Smoke exhaust ductwork Thermal expansion valve Thermal wheel Thermosiphon Thermostatic radiator valve Trickle vent Trombe wall Turning vanes Ultra-low particulate air (ULPA) Whole-house fan Windcatcher Wood-burning stove
In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]
If you’re looking to maintain, replace, or repair your home or business’s air conditioning system, “Make the Precision Decision”™ and give us a call. We are available 24/7 for all your emergency service needs. Our service area includes Litchfield Park, Mesa, Avondale, Peoria, Phoenix, Chandler, Scottsdale, Sun Lakes, Gilbert, Surprise, Glendale, Tempe, Goodyear and surrounding areas.
Consequently, this water must exit the air handler—typically through plastic pipe or a drain tube. That drain tube goes directly outside, often terminating near the compressor, or to a floor drain or to a small electric “condensate pump” located by the air handler. Where a condensate pump is used, it connects to a 1/2-inch vinyl or rubber tube that exits outdoors or to a drain.
Refrigeration air conditioning equipment usually reduces the absolute humidity of the air processed by the system. The relatively cold (below the dewpoint) evaporator coil condenses water vapor from the processed air, much like an ice-cold drink will condense water on the outside of a glass. Therefore, water vapor is removed from the cooled air and the relative humidity in the room is lowered. The water is usually sent to a drain or may simply drip onto the ground outdoors. The heat is ejected by the air conditioners condenser, which is located outside of the area being cooled.
Both the evaporator and the condenser are sealed. Therefore, a professional service person should be called for almost any maintenance other than routine cleaning. Central air conditioners should be professionally inspected and adjusted before the beginning of every cooling season. However, don't let your maintenance end with this annual checkup. While there aren't many repairs you can make yourself, there are specific maintenance procedures you can follow to keep your system operating at peak efficiency.

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC[1]) is the technology of indoor and vehicular environmental comfort. Its goal is to provide thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality. HVAC system design is a subdiscipline of mechanical engineering, based on the principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. "Refrigeration" is sometimes added to the field's abbreviation, as HVAC&R or HVACR or "ventilation" is dropped, as in HACR (as in the designation of HACR-rated circuit breakers).
R22 (also known as HCFC-22) has a global warming potential about 1,800 times higher than CO2.[62] It was phased out for use in new equipment by 2010, and is to be completely discontinued by 2020. Although these gasses can be recycled when air conditioning units are disposed of, uncontrolled dumping and leaking can release gas directly into the atmosphere.
In the most general sense, air conditioning can refer to any form of technology that modifies the condition of air (heating, (de-) humidification, cooling, cleaning, ventilation, or air movement). In common usage, though, "air conditioning" refers to systems which cool air. In construction, a complete system of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning is referred to as HVAC.[3] 

Drug-screened and always dressed professionally in uniform, the team of heating and cooling technicians from Kabran Air Conditioning & Heating respects your time, property, and investment. Through organized project management and competitive pricing, we ensure a rewarding start-to-finish experience.  We offer free estimates on system upgrades, extended Emergency Service hours, and convenient and affordable maintenance plans.  When you take advantage of membership in the KABRAN Cool Club, you’ll benefit from superior savings, priority scheduling, and much more.  Let us protect your comfort, safety, and investment with regular inspection and meticulous tuning.
5) Adjust your thermostat. If you are away for long periods every day, adjust your thermostat to a higher temperature for the time you are away. This will lessen the amount of time your unit has to work each day and will lengthen its life cycle. An additional benefit will be a lower utility bill each month. Some newer thermostats allow you to pre-program your thermostat to match your schedule so that your home will still be cool when you arrive. Optimizing your system’s usage will maximize its life in the long term.
The condensed, pressurized, and still usually somewhat hot liquid refrigerant is next routed through an expansion valve (often nothing more than a pinhole in the system's copper tubing) where it undergoes an abrupt reduction in pressure. That pressure reduction results in flash evaporation of a part of the liquid refrigerant, greatly lowering its temperature. The cold refrigerant is then routed through the evaporator. A fan blows the interior warm air (which is to be cooled) across the evaporator, causing the liquid part of the cold refrigerant mixture to evaporate as well, further lowering the temperature. The warm air is therefore cooled and is pumped by an exhaust fan/ blower into the room. To complete the refrigeration cycle, the refrigerant vapor is routed back into the compressor. In order for the process to have any efficiency, the cooling/evaporative portion of the system must be separated by some kind of physical barrier from the heating/condensing portion, and each portion must have its own fan to circulate its own "kind" of air (either the hot air or the cool air).
We relocate frequently and one of the biggest hassles of relocating to new areas is finding reputable companies that send qualified technicians to perform work when you need it, whether for annual preventative maintenance or during a house emergency. We’ve been through the process several times and always dread researching and trying new companies. This was our first HVAC call here in northern Virginia. We are in new construction and chose not to use the builder’s sub-contractor for a technician call but looked through Carrier’s website for a local business. Jeremy Garner with HVAC Unlimited responded to our service request the morning following our call. I shadowed him performing work and he was patient while I peppered him with questions. He helped expand my HVAC knowledge in order to be a better property owner of our systems. He performed the work we thought was necessary, in a timely and professional manner, and gave us options for future annual maintenance. HVAC Unlimited is definitely on our list of go-to contractors.
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