The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that all technicians who open a system containing a controlled refrigerant be certified to do so. There are four levels of certification, one of which is a “universal” certification to allow the HVAC technician to work on any type of equipment containing refrigerant. Your HVAC technician should be certified as “Level II Certified” at a minimum or, preferably, “Universal Certification” to work on your central air conditioner. Obtaining this certification information from your professional HVAC technician may be required in the event you are working with a realtor to sell your home. Costs for certification average $40 to $240.
I don’t normally rate a company 5 stars, because nobody is perfect, but these guys did a wonderful job. Carlos their sales person was knowledgeable and courteous. The office staff was extremely helpful and very friendly and the installers were on time and did a great job. Even the county inspector said, “Wow, these guys did a great job!” That’s the first time I’ve ever heard an inspector give his personal opinion on a job. I’m sixty one and I’ve had to have a lot of systems replace over the years. Well done everyone at Gator Air. Your the best! If your looking to replace your AC system, look no further.
Vredevoogd Heating & Cooling stands behind its services and products with the strongest guarantees you’ll find anywhere. When you invite us into your home to service or install your HVAC system or do Furnace Repair work in Grand Rapids and beyond, we perform our job with an outstanding level of care and efficiency. Having served Michigan for 54 years, we never rest on our laurels. To remain the best, we intend to give our best every time, every job.
Air conditioners often use a fan to distribute the conditioned air to an occupied space such as a building or a car to improve thermal comfort and indoor air quality. Electric refrigerant-based AC units range from small units that can cool a small bedroom, which can be carried by a single adult, to massive units installed on the roof of office towers that can cool an entire building. The cooling is typically achieved through a refrigeration cycle, but sometimes evaporation or free cooling is used. Air conditioning systems can also be made based on desiccants (chemicals which remove moisture from the air) and subterraneous pipes that can distribute the heated refrigerant to the ground for cooling.[2]
Ductwork pinging or popping. If you hear a pinging or popping sound coming from metal ductwork, this may be caused by thermal expansion or by air blowing past a loose flap of metal. Track along the duct runs, listening for the sound. If you find it, make a small dent in the sheet metal to provide a more rigid surface that’s less likely to move as it heats and cools.
If a heat exchanger cracks or contains holes, leaks can release carbon monoxide into your home. Carbon monoxide is nearly impossible for humans to detect on their own due to its characteristics of being colorless and odorless. Because of this, it is referred to as “The Silent Killer”. Some symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, dizziness, fatigue, nausea and vomiting. It is extremely important to have a HVAC technician perform a furnace inspection annually to prevent problems such as carbon monoxide poisoning. UGI Heating, Cooling & Plumbing offers yearly maintenance packages and service agreements that include yearly maintenance and furnace inspections.
Trying to replace an HVAC unit when out of town isn't easy, but Gator Air made it seamless. I was able to quickly schedule the estimator to come to my property and I was emailed several options. I was never pushed to make a decision or "sold" unwanted options. The installers were punctual and professional. Outstanding follow up too. I highly recommend!

A pinging or popping sound coming from the duct work can come from thermal expansion—the ductwork expanding and contracting as it heats and cools.  Or, air blowing past a loose flap of metal can make the sound. Track along the duct runs, listening for the sound. If you locate it, make a small dent in the sheet metal to provide a more rigid surface that’s less likely to move as it heats and cools.

In 1906, Stuart W. Cramer of Charlotte was exploring ways to add moisture to the air in his textile mill. Cramer coined the term "air conditioning", using it in a patent claim he filed that year as an analogue to "water conditioning", then a well-known process for making textiles easier to process. He combined moisture with ventilation to "condition" and change the air in the factories, controlling the humidity so necessary in textile plants. Willis Carrier adopted the term and incorporated it into the name of his company.[10]
Air flow meter Aquastat BACnet Blower door Building automation Carbon dioxide sensor Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) Gas sensor Home energy monitor Humidistat HVAC control system Intelligent buildings LonWorks Minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) OpenTherm Programmable communicating thermostat Programmable thermostat Psychrometrics Room temperature Smart thermostat Thermostat Thermostatic radiator valve
Central, "all-air" air-conditioning systems (or package systems) with a combined outdoor condenser/evaporator unit are often installed in North American residences, offices, and public buildings, but are difficult to retrofit (install in a building that was not designed to receive it) because of the bulky air ducts required. (Minisplit ductless systems are used in these situations.) Outside of North America, packaged systems are only used in limited applications involving large indoor space such as stadiums, theatres or exhibition halls.
Talk to your HVAC repair contractor about options to make HVAC repair costs more affordable. Many contractors offer financing options to assist customers in this very position, as well as payment plans. HVAC companies know HVAC repair costs can come as quite a shock in some scenarios, and want to help you get the repairs your system needs to preserve your comfort and safety.
Some of the things that determine air conditioning capacity in Arizona include, but are not limited to: your area’s unique climate, monsoon humidity, number of windows, their location, and their NFRC rating, ceiling and wall insulation factors, which direction your home is facing, how much heat your appliances produce, how high your ceilings are, if you have a basement, if you have proper attic ventilation, the location of trees on your property, and even the number of people who occupy the home.
Any concern with your cooling system, however minor, is worth checking out.  NATE-certified technicians can quickly identify the problem and prevent more extensive and costly damage.  Catching defects quickly is the key to cost-effective repairs.  Elevated operational noise such as grinding, screeching, or wheezing is more than aggravating.  Think of those sounds as warning bells.  They’re an indication of component failure.  Listen to what they’re telling you and call for professional assistance.  Worn or misaligned belts are easily repaired.  Strange smells from contaminants such as mold or mildew are best handled before allergens enter breathing air, diminish airflow, and block the coil.  Temperature swings, unstable humidity, or extended run times are all signs of bigger problems on the way.  Call Ferran Services at 407-422-3551 (Orlando) or 386-322-6168 (Volusia), and our licensed technicians will perform a complete system check, ensuring safe, efficient and reliable operation.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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