This type of furnace is fueled by liquid propane gas, which is burned to push hot air through your home. A pilot light ignites the burners within a combustion chamber, which push heat into the heat exchanger and eventually through your entire home. Repairing this type of furnace can be more expensive than its electric alternative. For example here are some common propane gas repairs and their costs:

American design standards are legislated in the Uniform Mechanical Code or International Mechanical Code. In certain states, counties, or cities, either of these codes may be adopted and amended via various legislative processes. These codes are updated and published by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) or the International Code Council (ICC) respectively, on a 3-year code development cycle. Typically, local building permit departments are charged with enforcement of these standards on private and certain public properties.
My experience with Cody & Sons was an A+! I am always concerned with these companies taking advantage and charging more than they should. My technician, Mike, was on time, extremely professional and really knew his job. Prior to Cody & Sons, I had 5 other name brand HVAC companies service my furnace but no one could tell me why I smelled gas each time I turned my unit on. Several tried to sell me a new furnace. Mike thoroughly examined my unit and determined what the problem was. He then patiently explained it all to me in laymen's terms. I approved the work and Mike took care of it. I can't express the relief I feel knowing that my furnace is safe again and I am not inhaling fumes!!! From start to finish Mike took about an hour. The price I was charged was very fair! I am happy to say that I have finally found my go to HVAC company. THANK YOU, MIKE and Cody & Sons!!!
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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