The cost to replace your gas furnace will vary based on the type and size of furnace you select, labor and installation costs, and any repairs your HVAC system may need. Nationally, average HVAC prices for a heating specialist range between $1,800 and $2,500. It’s important to select the right size gas furnace for your heating needs. A furnace that’s too small won’t heat your house properly, while a furnace that’s too large will run inefficiently, cycling on and off and likely breaking down sooner. HVAC specialists calculate your exact heat needs by measuring your home and incorporating variables such as the regional climate and your home’s level of insulation. Retail pricing for gas furnaces can range from $650 up to $3,000 and more. The higher the AFUE (annual fuel utilization efficiency) rating of the furnace, the more efficient it is at turning fuel into heat and the lower your carbon footprint and utility bill will be. HVAC installation costs are often based on an hourly rate and can range from under $50 to over $100 per hour, depending on the company and the furnace being installed. Higher-end furnaces cost more to install because they require added labor and expertise. For a typical installation, it might take two HVAC installation pros one day or less to remove your old furnace and replace it with a new one.
The thermocouple is a copper rod that the pilot flame heats-up. When it gets hot enough, the thermocouple signals that there is enough heat to burn the gas fuel being released into the appliance—and so it allows the gas to be released to the burners. In some cases where the pilot light won’t stay lit, the thermocouple needs to be adjusted or replaced. This is generally a job for a professional.
Both the evaporator and the condenser are sealed. Therefore, a professional service person should be called for almost any maintenance other than routine cleaning. Central air conditioners should be professionally inspected and adjusted before the beginning of every cooling season. However, don't let your maintenance end with this annual checkup. While there aren't many repairs you can make yourself, there are specific maintenance procedures you can follow to keep your system operating at peak efficiency.
Recent Review: The service call went well. Fixed a simple problem with my furnace and then during the A/C check up, they found that the smaller compressor needed replacement. It's two years old so thought it was under warranty and determined that it was, so they took care of that for me. Each time I've used these guys, I've been pleased with their service, professionalism and punctuality. Plus the call I get from the office saying the service person is on the way to my home. That way I don't have to take half a day off work to meet the service person.

We happily offer all of our services in St Marys county. We view our neighbors in St. Mary’s county as important and valuable as our friends in Calvert. If you live in St Marys and you’re not sure if we can help you with your specific problem, please don’t hesitate to contact us and find out! We value all inquiries and our eager to help and assist our neighbors throughout all of Southern Maryland.


Many homeowners don't often think of the state of their furnace—that is until, the first cold day of the year comes around and the furnace won't turn on or only blows cold air. Keeping an eye out for common signs of trouble can help you avoid a complete furnace breakdown. Addressing any issues early on can also help you avoid most extensive (and therefore, more expensive) repairs down the road.
You can usually slip the belt on the motor’s (smaller) pulley first and then start it on the blower pulley. Rotate the blower pulley by hand, holding the belt in place but keeping your fingers from getting caught between the belt and the pulley. The belt should slip right into place. If it seems to be too tight or difficult to set in place, it may be necessary to adjust the motor mount to provide more slack.
Next check and clean the furnace’s flame sensor. The video below shows you how—note that this guy fixes it in about 5 minutes. We would probably use a little bit of emory paper, but he cleans the sensor with a 5-dollar bill. Another video further down the page under the discussion of “If your furnace keeps shutting off after about 5 minutes” shows the same project with a different brand of furnace.

You might guess it from the name: the heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually heats the air your blower motor pushes through the furnace. It consists of a chamber in which the heat energy produced by natural or propane gas is transferred to the forced air. At the same time, this part also includes a vent through which the gases themselves are safely removed from the unit and the air that enters your home. Because of these gases, a problem with your heat exchanger needs to be dealt with promptly. Over time, cracks in the exchanger can result in carbon monoxide leaks. Taking care of the problem once again means understanding the existence of a range: repairing your heat exchanger can cost as little as $100, but a full replacement may cost up to $1,200.
Visit our one-of-a-kind showroom and explore the latest options on the market today. Check out sound decibel levels, heating and cooling capacity, learn how these systems work and compare old to new. The team from Strongsville Heating & Air Conditioning provides the products, guidance and service you can trust to surpass all your expectations. The weather is no match for our dedication to your satisfaction. At Strongsville Heating & Air Conditioning Customers Set the Goal….We Exceed It!

Your furnace's flame sensor is essentially a safety mechanism. As a thin metallic rod in front of the flame inside the unit, it's sole purpose is to confirm that your gas valves only open when a flame actually exists to burn that gas. When the flame sensor stop working, on the other hand, gas leaks can occur. To repair your furnace's flame sensor, expect to spend between $80 and $250. Even a full replacement of this part typically does not go above that range.
Starting to feel the damp Florida Summer Heat? Without understanding the science, you may think putting in a bigger unit will give you more substantial cooling, but a unit that is not properly sized will cost you more and could cause major humidity problems in your home! Where comfort meets efficiency, that is where you’ll find Ferran, your home performance contractor!

2Be sure the furnace’s circuit breaker is on or that its fuse has not blown. Check both the main electrical panel and any secondary subpanels that supply power to the unit. If the circuit has blown or tripped, reset the circuit breaker by flipping it all the way off and then on again. Or replace the fuse. If the circuit blows again, there is probably a short in the electrical system providing power to the furnace. For this, you may need to call an electrical contractor.
Though Harrison had commercial success establishing a second ice company back in Sydney in 1860, he later entered the debate over how to compete against the American advantage of ice-refrigerated beef sales to the United Kingdom. He wrote: "Fresh meat frozen and packed as if for a voyage, so that the refrigerating process may be continued for any required period", and in 1873 prepared the sailing ship Norfolk for an experimental beef shipment to the United Kingdom. His choice of a cold room system instead of installing a refrigeration system upon the ship itself proved disastrous when the ice was consumed faster than expected.[citation needed]
The condensed, pressurized, and still usually somewhat hot liquid refrigerant is next routed through an expansion valve (often nothing more than a pinhole in the system's copper tubing) where it undergoes an abrupt reduction in pressure. That pressure reduction results in flash evaporation of a part of the liquid refrigerant, greatly lowering its temperature. The cold refrigerant is then routed through the evaporator. A fan blows the interior warm air (which is to be cooled) across the evaporator, causing the liquid part of the cold refrigerant mixture to evaporate as well, further lowering the temperature. The warm air is therefore cooled and is pumped by an exhaust fan/ blower into the room. To complete the refrigeration cycle, the refrigerant vapor is routed back into the compressor. In order for the process to have any efficiency, the cooling/evaporative portion of the system must be separated by some kind of physical barrier from the heating/condensing portion, and each portion must have its own fan to circulate its own "kind" of air (either the hot air or the cool air).
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