Air Conditioning Your home's air conditioner is an essential part of your overall indoor comfort. A properly working system can mean the difference between a cool, comfortable summer and a hot, miserable few months. If you're currently dealing with a broken air conditioner, an inefficient system, or you would like to schedule a routine, pre-season tune-up, Horizon Services is here to help!
The belt should slip right into place. If it seems to be too tight or difficult to set in place, it may be necessary to adjust the motor mount to provide more slack. Then you can re-tighten the tension once the belt is in place. Check the manufacturer’s specifications for proper tension—in most cases, the belt should deflect about an inch when you press down on it.
Because an air conditioner moves heat between the indoor coil and the outdoor coil, both must be kept clean. This means that, in addition to replacing the air filter at the evaporator coil, it is also necessary to regularly clean the condenser coil. Failure to keep the condenser clean will eventually result in harm to the compressor, because the condenser coil is responsible for discharging both the indoor heat (as picked up by the evaporator) and the heat generated by the electric motor driving the compressor.
You might guess it from the name: the heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually heats the air your blower motor pushes through the furnace. It consists of a chamber in which the heat energy produced by natural or propane gas is transferred to the forced air. At the same time, this part also includes a vent through which the gases themselves are safely removed from the unit and the air that enters your home. Because of these gases, a problem with your heat exchanger needs to be dealt with promptly. Over time, cracks in the exchanger can result in carbon monoxide leaks. Taking care of the problem once again means understanding the existence of a range: repairing your heat exchanger can cost as little as $100, but a full replacement may cost up to $1,200.
The basic concept behind air conditioning is said to have been applied in ancient Egypt, where reeds were hung in windows and were moistened with trickling water. The evaporation of water cooled the air blowing through the window. This process also made the air more humid, which can be beneficial in a dry desert climate. In ancient Rome, water from aqueducts was circulated through the walls of certain houses to cool them. Other techniques in medieval Persia involved the use of cisterns and wind towers to cool buildings during the hot season.[5]

Consequently, this water must exit the air handler—typically through plastic pipe or a drain tube. That drain tube goes directly outside, often terminating near the compressor, or to a floor drain or to a small electric “condensate pump” located by the air handler. Where a condensate pump is used, it connects to a 1/2-inch vinyl or rubber tube that exits outdoors or to a drain.
Inside the unit, the air passes over the evaporator coil first, and is cooled and dehumidified. The now dehumidified, cold air then passes over the condenser coil where it is warmed up again. Then the air is released back into the room. The unit produces warm, dehumidified air and can usually be placed freely in the environment (room) that is to be conditioned.
7) Schedule an annual tune-up with an HVAC professional. A trained HVAC technician can detect most problems before they become major ones. With a cost of around $100 for a routine maintenance call, the benefits will likely outweigh the costs by a considerable margin. A typical tune-up will include various tests to ensure your unit’s internal parts are functioning correctly, as well as a filter check, and a refrigerant charge if needed. Your technician will likely also clear the drain, and clean your unit thoroughly inside and out.
HVAC equipment is estimated to last about 15 to 20 years. Yet over the years, parts go out and need to be repaired. Heat sensors, exchangers, and ducts can become worn out. Air conditioning motors may need repairing from time to time. For repairs to your heating and air conditioning systems, and even general maintenance, let HomeAdvisor help. Enter your zip code and let us connect you with prescreened HVAC repair services near you.
The 2nd-century Chinese mechanical engineer and inventor Ding Huan of the Han Dynasty invented a rotary fan for air conditioning, with seven wheels 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and manually powered by prisoners of the time.[6] In 747, Emperor Xuanzong (r. 712–762) of the Tang Dynasty (618–907) had the Cool Hall (Liang Dian 涼殿) built in the imperial palace, which the Tang Yulin describes as having water-powered fan wheels for air conditioning as well as rising jet streams of water from fountains. During the subsequent Song Dynasty (960–1279), written sources mentioned the air conditioning rotary fan as even more widely used.[7]
Allow our experts to help with any of your heating and cooling needs or questions. Our wide array of expertise and background will benefit you and your home, whether you are considering a replacement system or evaluating your whole system to check for areas of improvement. We can help you reach your optimum indoor comfort. Give us a ring at 866-397-3787 or request an appointment online.
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that all technicians who open a system containing a controlled refrigerant be certified to do so. There are four levels of certification, one of which is a “universal” certification to allow the HVAC technician to work on any type of equipment containing refrigerant. Your HVAC technician should be certified as “Level II Certified” at a minimum or, preferably, “Universal Certification” to work on your central air conditioner. Obtaining this certification information from your professional HVAC technician may be required in the event you are working with a realtor to sell your home. Costs for certification average $40 to $240.
If your compressor doesn’t have an overload button and you hear it humming or buzzing, poke a screwdriver or stick down through the top grille and try to spin the fan blades clockwise. If doing this gives the fan enough of a boost to get it going, the unit has a faulty capacitor that must be replaced. See How to Test and Replace an AC Run Capacitor, above.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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