The selection of the working fluids (refrigerants) has a significant impact not only on the performance of the air conditioners but on the environment as well. Most refrigerants used for air conditioning contribute to global warming, and many also deplete the ozone layer.[60] CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs are potent greenhouse gases when leaked to the atmosphere.
1) Change your filter. The simplest and most effective way to keep your AC running smoothly is changing your filter once a month. By regularly changing your filter, you reduce a lot of the burden on your system. A dirty or clogged filter makes your air conditioner work much harder than does a clean filter. Changing your filters regularly is easy on your budget and easy on your system as well. It will lower your utility bill and extend the life of your AC.
We want to compliment your fine sales and installation team. They are outstanding. Carlos, your sales rep., was highly informative. We reviewed our needs and we ultimately chose the Trane XV-18 variable speed system. Carlos did not try to up sell us with things that we did not need but he did help us choose the correct upgraded filter and UV light that we wanted. We told Carlos that our research indicated that the quality of the installation of the unit was at least as important as the unit itself, and Carlos agreed. Carlos pointed out that new proper sized duct work and copper wiring would be required for a correct installation, and that we needed to add two more returns. We asked if more returns were needed and Carlos said that would not be cost effective. That was great to hear. Carlos assured us that the installation team of Willie and Gary, both lead installers, would be used. They were both superb. They came on time and worked for 12 and 1/2 hours. It was a 93 degree day so the heat in the attic was intense. We kept telling them to take a break but they continued to work up there in what must have been 130+ temperatures. They were amazing! They were neat and cleaned up any mess they made. They patiently answered all of our many questions and gave us helpful tips. They were truly professional in all respects. We also note that Stacy, Angie and Karen of your office staff were each courteous, accommodating and efficient. They helped things to go smoothly. Carlos, Gary, Stacy, Angie, Willie and Karen are each great assets to your company. We would be comfortable recommending that team of people to anyone! Ken and Kathy Luban
In the UK, the Ozone Regulations[63] came into force in 2000 and banned the use of ozone depleting HCFC refrigerants such as R22 in new systems. The Regulation banned the use of R22 as a "top-up" fluid for maintenance between 2010 (for virgin fluid) and 2015 (for recycled fluid). This means that equipment that uses R22 can still operate, as long as it does not leak. Although R22 is now banned, units that use the refrigerant can still be serviced and maintained.
Terrible - Explained to tech that we had cold air on heat status. I placed Thermostat on emergency heat and was able to get some heat. I told him TXU had installed a a new thermostat and I think he may have installed it incorrectly but wasn't, sure. He said it would cost us more money if he fixed problem if there was one. He said I could pay for it and get reimbursed from insurance company. When he said it would cost us money I said I would live with it. I plan on calling a reputable repair company. He did not check furnace or temperature of house
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5). 
×