Ventilating or ventilation (the V in HVAC) is the process of exchanging or replacing air in any space to provide high indoor air quality which involves temperature control, oxygen replenishment, and removal of moisture, odors, smoke, heat, dust, airborne bacteria, carbon dioxide, and other gases. Ventilation removes unpleasant smells and excessive moisture, introduces outside air, keeps interior building air circulating, and prevents stagnation of the interior air.
Although HVAC is executed in individual buildings or other enclosed spaces (like NORAD's underground headquarters), the equipment involved is in some cases an extension of a larger district heating (DH) or district cooling (DC) network, or a combined DHC network. In such cases, the operating and maintenance aspects are simplified and metering becomes necessary to bill for the energy that is consumed, and in some cases energy that is returned to the larger system. For example, at a given time one building may be utilizing chilled water for air conditioning and the warm water it returns may be used in another building for heating, or for the overall heating-portion of the DHC network (likely with energy added to boost the temperature).[4][5][6]
High-efficiency condensing furnaces (90% AFUE and above) are a bit more complex than conventional furnaces. The main differences between a conventional and condensing furnace are the heat exchanger technology used to extract heat from the combustion process and the method used to exhaust the combustion gases. In these ways, the furnaces are very different. The condensing furnace does not have a significantly more efficient combustion process than does a conventional furnace; both use gas burners with electronic ignition. The difference lies in that the condensing furnace has a more efficient heat extraction process after combustion.

6) Check your ductwork and seal open spaces. Make sure all your doors and windows are properly sealed to help keep your home cool. Perform a visual inspection of your ductwork occasionally to be sure it is sealed correctly. If the ductwork is not properly sealed, cool air will escape before getting into your home. The less cool air that escapes your home, the less your unit will have to work.


Any concern with your cooling system, however minor, is worth checking out.  NATE-certified technicians can quickly identify the problem and prevent more extensive and costly damage.  Catching defects quickly is the key to cost-effective repairs.  Elevated operational noise such as grinding, screeching, or wheezing is more than aggravating.  Think of those sounds as warning bells.  They’re an indication of component failure.  Listen to what they’re telling you and call for professional assistance.  Worn or misaligned belts are easily repaired.  Strange smells from contaminants such as mold or mildew are best handled before allergens enter breathing air, diminish airflow, and block the coil.  Temperature swings, unstable humidity, or extended run times are all signs of bigger problems on the way.  Call Ferran Services at 407-422-3551 (Orlando) or 386-322-6168 (Volusia), and our licensed technicians will perform a complete system check, ensuring safe, efficient and reliable operation.
Before opening the electrical cover on the A/C unit, be sure to shut off all power to the compressor unit and the indoor furnace or air handler, and verify that it is off. Note that this may mean shutting off a circuit breaker that serves the furnace and air handler, and then, near the compressor, pulling out the disconnect block (or shutting off the 220-volt power) to the outdoor compressor.

To keep your furnace in good working order it’s important to have it regularly cleaned. The national average furnace cleaning cost ranges from $60 to $80, though prices can vary greatly based on where you live in the country and what your furnace maintenance includes. An HVAC company may have different rates for different levels of furnace maintenance. For example,one company may offer general furnace maintenance for $79 and advanced maintenance for $138. Another company may offer a 38-point maintenance check for $89 and a 64-point maintenance check for $178. According to Energy.gov, a standard furnace cleaning and maintenance visit can include:


7) Schedule an annual tune-up with an HVAC professional. A trained HVAC technician can detect most problems before they become major ones. With a cost of around $100 for a routine maintenance call, the benefits will likely outweigh the costs by a considerable margin. A typical tune-up will include various tests to ensure your unit’s internal parts are functioning correctly, as well as a filter check, and a refrigerant charge if needed. Your technician will likely also clear the drain, and clean your unit thoroughly inside and out.
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