The concrete pads under home air conditioner and heat exchanger units tend to settle over the years. As long as there’s no strain on the copper coolant tubes and electrical lines, and the unit stays dry and level, it’s OK that the pad has sunk. But if it continues to sink and pulls the lines tight, or if water puddles around the unit, you’ll need to take action. Here’s how to fix it.


Your HVAC professional can perform a yearly tune-up of your system for around $80-$100. This yearly maintenance can go far toward heading off major repairs to your system and provide you with peace of mind and considerable savings in the long term. Additionally, regular servicing of your AC unit can help a home inspector to certify that your unit is working properly in the event you decide to sell your home.

Furnaces and thermostats are not mix-and-match appliances. Using the wrong type of thermostat with a furnace will cause operating problems and can be dangerous. Although thermostats look similar, they are designed very differently. There are numerous types of heating systems and thermostat systems and they need to be coordinated for safe and proper operation. There are three types of thermostat systems used today: millivoltage, low voltage, and line voltage.​


Many homeowners don't often think of the state of their furnace—that is until, the first cold day of the year comes around and the furnace won't turn on or only blows cold air. Keeping an eye out for common signs of trouble can help you avoid a complete furnace breakdown. Addressing any issues early on can also help you avoid most extensive (and therefore, more expensive) repairs down the road.
A number of other variables can influence your decision on whether to repair or replace your furnace, as well. In addition to cost and brand, consider the expected lifetime of your furnace. If it is more than 15 years old, it might make more sense to invest in a new unit even if it costs more than simply repairing the current problem. Long-term costs also play into the equation. For example, your new furnace may be more energy efficient than the current unit. Even though you will pay more for the actual installation, you might be able to make back your investment through lower energy bills. To make your decision, consult with a reliable professional on what to do. In inspecting your furnace, they will be able to make an informed recommendation that looks not just to the next year, but years into the future. That way, you can make the best possible decision for your home and budget long-term.
We want to compliment your fine sales and installation team. They are outstanding. Carlos, your sales rep., was highly informative. We reviewed our needs and we ultimately chose the Trane XV-18 variable speed system. Carlos did not try to up sell us with things that we did not need but he did help us choose the correct upgraded filter and UV light that we wanted. We told Carlos that our research indicated that the quality of the installation of the unit was at least as important as the unit itself, and Carlos agreed. Carlos pointed out that new proper sized duct work and copper wiring would be required for a correct installation, and that we needed to add two more returns. We asked if more returns were needed and Carlos said that would not be cost effective. That was great to hear. Carlos assured us that the installation team of Willie and Gary, both lead installers, would be used. They were both superb. They came on time and worked for 12 and 1/2 hours. It was a 93 degree day so the heat in the attic was intense. We kept telling them to take a break but they continued to work up there in what must have been 130+ temperatures. They were amazing! They were neat and cleaned up any mess they made. They patiently answered all of our many questions and gave us helpful tips. They were truly professional in all respects. We also note that Stacy, Angie and Karen of your office staff were each courteous, accommodating and efficient. They helped things to go smoothly. Carlos, Gary, Stacy, Angie, Willie and Karen are each great assets to your company. We would be comfortable recommending that team of people to anyone! Ken and Kathy Luban
Because an air conditioner moves heat between the indoor coil and the outdoor coil, both must be kept clean. This means that, in addition to replacing the air filter at the evaporator coil, it is also necessary to regularly clean the condenser coil. Failure to keep the condenser clean will eventually result in harm to the compressor, because the condenser coil is responsible for discharging both the indoor heat (as picked up by the evaporator) and the heat generated by the electric motor driving the compressor.
Most central air conditioners are connected to a home's forced-air distribution system. Thus, the same motor, blower, and ductwork used for heating are used to distribute cool air from the air conditioning system. When a central air conditioner is operating, hot air inside the house flows to the furnace through the return-air duct. The hot air is moved by the blower across the cooled evaporator coil in the plenum and is then delivered through ducts to cool the house. When the air conditioner works but the house doesn't cool, the problem is probably in the distribution system.
Ground source, or geothermal, heat pumps are similar to ordinary heat pumps, but instead of transferring heat to or from outside air, they rely on the stable, even temperature of the earth to provide heating and air conditioning. Many regions experience seasonal temperature extremes, which would require large-capacity heating and cooling equipment to heat or cool buildings. For example, a conventional heat pump system used to heat a building in Montana's −70 °F (−57 °C) low temperature or cool a building in the highest temperature ever recorded in the US—134 °F (57 °C) in Death Valley, California, in 1913 would require a large amount of energy due to the extreme difference between inside and outside air temperatures. A few feet below the earth's surface, however, the ground remains at a relatively constant temperature. Utilizing this large source of relatively moderate temperature earth, a heating or cooling system's capacity can often be significantly reduced. Although ground temperatures vary according to latitude, at 6 feet (1.8 m) underground, temperatures generally only range from 45 to 75 °F (7 to 24 °C).

Vredevoogd Heating & Cooling Grand Rapids employs more than 80 people who are proud to work under the Vredevoogd Heating & Cooling banner. Each team member shares our company values for service excellence. All of our employees are intensely screened and background checked so that you have peace of mind when they enter your home. Moreover, our technicians are certified to work in the HVAC industry and provide the level of expertise that our customers expect from Vredevoogd Heating & Cooling. We back our technicians’ work and continue to make training a priority so that all of our techs are familiar with the latest HVAC models and advances. Our customers deserve the best, so the best is what we deliver to each and every job.

The burner can be fueled by gas or by oil. It is the component that creates the required heat. It can be controlled by a thermostat or by the fan limit control, which is located in the plenum chamber. A dirty air filter or a blocked fan can cause the burner to turn off and on more frequently than necessary. If you are experiencing this issue, the first thing you should try is to change the air filter. If that does not help the issue, contact UGI Heating, Cooling & Plumbing and we will send an expert technician to further troubleshoot your gas or oil furnace burner issues.
In the UK, the Ozone Regulations[63] came into force in 2000 and banned the use of ozone depleting HCFC refrigerants such as R22 in new systems. The Regulation banned the use of R22 as a "top-up" fluid for maintenance between 2010 (for virgin fluid) and 2015 (for recycled fluid). This means that equipment that uses R22 can still operate, as long as it does not leak. Although R22 is now banned, units that use the refrigerant can still be serviced and maintained.

The performance of vapor compression refrigeration cycles[27] is limited by thermodynamics. These air conditioning and heat pump devices move heat rather than convert it from one form to another, so thermal efficiencies do not appropriately describe the performance of these devices. The Coefficient-of-Performance (COP) measures performance, but this dimensionless measure has not been adopted. Instead, the Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) has traditionally been used to characterize the performance of many HVAC systems. EER is the Energy Efficiency Ratio based on a 35 °C (95 °F) outdoor temperature. To more accurately describe the performance of air conditioning equipment over a typical cooling season a modified version of the EER, the Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER), or in Europe the ESEER, is used. SEER ratings are based on seasonal temperature averages instead of a constant 35 °C (95 °F) outdoor temperature. The current industry minimum SEER rating is 14 SEER.[28]

Our air conditioner repair trucks are fully stocked with air conditioning repair parts and our highly trained air conditioning technicians and installation teams can repair or install a central air conditioning system right the first time. No job is too big or small; whether you need air conditioner repair work for a single unit or multiple units; you’ll get speedy, high-quality service that you can depend on. Our reliable service is the main reason so many consider us to be the best AC repair company in Houston TX! Call us now at 713-766-3605713-766-3605 to schedule an appointment.
Before opening the electrical cover on the A/C unit, be sure to shut off all power to the compressor unit and the indoor furnace or air handler, and verify that it is off. Note that this may mean shutting off a circuit breaker that serves the furnace and air handler, and then, near the compressor, pulling out the disconnect block (or shutting off the 220-volt power) to the outdoor compressor.
×