The concrete pads under home air conditioner and heat exchanger units tend to settle over the years. As long as there’s no strain on the copper coolant tubes and electrical lines, and the unit stays dry and level, it’s OK that the pad has sunk. But if it continues to sink and pulls the lines tight, or if water puddles around the unit, you’ll need to take action. Here’s how to fix it.
The last thing you need is for your air conditioning to stop working in the middle of a heat wave. If this has ever happened to you, you understand the need for a reliable company to come out and get the air conditioning going again. Let us prove to you that we are the right company for you in Southern Maryland. As a service we do offer maintenance of all air conditioning units to help prevent this problem, but we understand that things happen!
Finally, don't underestimate the thermostat as a potential reason why your furnace is not working. Everything on the heating unit itself may function perfectly, but your home still will not heat right if the console you use to set the temperature doesn't communicate your input. A faulty thermostat can either be due to the wall unit itself, or the wiring that connects it to your furnace. Average thermostat repair costs are between $108 and $282, including labor. Replacement costs, of course, depend on the thermostat you choose. Visit our thermostat repair cost guide to learn more about this type of issue.

Put simply, any home that uses air pushed through ductwork for heating purposes takes advantage of forced air heating. In other words, this term refers not to your furnace, but to the delivery method of the heat throughout your home. Forced air heating is possible with electric or gas furnaces, or a heat pump. Any issues with this delivery system that aren't directly related to the furnace likely have to do with the duct work, which costs between $35 and $55 per linear square foot to repair, or the air handling unit.
A heat pump is an air conditioner in which the refrigeration cycle can be reversed, producing heating instead of cooling in the indoor environment. They are also commonly referred to as a "reverse cycle air conditioner". The heat pump is significantly more energy efficient than electric resistance heating. Some homeowners elect to have a heat pump system installed as a feature of a central air conditioner. When the heat pump is in heating mode, the indoor evaporator coil switches roles and becomes the condenser coil, producing heat. The outdoor condenser unit also switches roles to serve as the evaporator, and discharges cold air (colder than the ambient outdoor air).
Ventilation is the process of changing or replacing air in any space to control temperature or remove any combination of moisture, odors, smoke, heat, dust, airborne bacteria, or carbon dioxide, and to replenish oxygen. Ventilation includes both the exchange of air with the outside as well as circulation of air within the building. It is one of the most important factors for maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in buildings. Methods for ventilating a building may be divided into mechanical/forced and natural types.[16]
The basic concept behind air conditioning is said to have been applied in ancient Egypt, where reeds were hung in windows and were moistened with trickling water. The evaporation of water cooled the air blowing through the window. This process also made the air more humid, which can be beneficial in a dry desert climate. In ancient Rome, water from aqueducts was circulated through the walls of certain houses to cool them. Other techniques in medieval Persia involved the use of cisterns and wind towers to cool buildings during the hot season.[5]
Many disconnect blocks contain two cartridge fuses. Check them before you proceed with repairs (Photo 3). A blown fuse is a sign of a failing part inside the condensing unit. So don’t just replace it and think you’ve solved the problem. Instead, replace the parts we show here. Then install new fuses and fire up the unit. If it blows again, call a pro—you’ve got more serious issues.
We had an exceptional experience with Gator Air, in particular Carlos. He presented us with quotes for different types of AC units, told us facts about said units and left us to make our decision. No high pressure sales. The installers were professional and cleaned up when they were through. A nice surprise was the 1 year free maintenance of the unit. We belonged to the Gator Club so to not have to pay it for the next year was an added bonus. Thank you GatorAir for making the experience an enjoyable one. 

As a Carrier Factory Authorized Dealer and President’s award winner, we specialize in world-recognized, award-winning, and technologically advanced heating, cooling and air quality products. From air conditioning and heat pumps to furnaces and boilers, you’re going to benefit from increased energy efficiency, decreased sound levels and innovative features that make everyday life easier, more enjoyable and far more comfortable. We provide FREE estimates and flexible financing opportunities. Our goal is to maximize value, sustainability and long-term customer satisfaction.
In the case of heated water or steam, piping is used to transport the heat to the rooms. Most modern hot water boiler heating systems have a circulator, which is a pump, to move hot water through the distribution system (as opposed to older gravity-fed systems). The heat can be transferred to the surrounding air using radiators, hot water coils (hydro-air), or other heat exchangers. The radiators may be mounted on walls or installed within the floor to produce floor heat.
Precision’s technicians are all NATE certified. This is the highest certification in the air conditioning industry. With that, we can take pride in saying that we provide the best AC repair Phoenix residents can get. Our technicians are thoroughly screened and tested before they begin work on your home. Our AC technicians provide top-notch Phoenix air conditioning repair, and proof of that is their ability to repair most every brand of HVAC equipment. These brands include Trane, Bryant, Ruud, Goodman, Amana, Precision, Armstrong, Carrier, Coleman, Honeywell, Janitrol, Lennox, Payne, Rheem, York, Goettl, American Standard along with many more.
Put simply, any home that uses air pushed through ductwork for heating purposes takes advantage of forced air heating. In other words, this term refers not to your furnace, but to the delivery method of the heat throughout your home. Forced air heating is possible with electric or gas furnaces, or a heat pump. Any issues with this delivery system that aren't directly related to the furnace likely have to do with the duct work, which costs between $35 and $55 per linear square foot to repair, or the air handling unit.
Without proper ventilation, carbon monoxide can be lethal at concentrations of 1000 ppm (0.1%). However, at several hundred ppm, carbon monoxide exposure induces headaches, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. Carbon monoxide binds with hemoglobin in the blood, forming carboxyhemoglobin, reducing the blood's ability to transport oxygen. The primary health concerns associated with carbon monoxide exposure are its cardiovascular and neurobehavioral effects. Carbon monoxide can cause atherosclerosis (the hardening of arteries) and can also trigger heart attacks. Neurologically, carbon monoxide exposure reduces hand to eye coordination, vigilance, and continuous performance. It can also affect time discrimination.[15]
Ground source, or geothermal, heat pumps are similar to ordinary heat pumps, but instead of transferring heat to or from outside air, they rely on the stable, even temperature of the earth to provide heating and air conditioning. Many regions experience seasonal temperature extremes, which would require large-capacity heating and cooling equipment to heat or cool buildings. For example, a conventional heat pump system used to heat a building in Montana's −70 °F (−57 °C) low temperature or cool a building in the highest temperature ever recorded in the US—134 °F (57 °C) in Death Valley, California, in 1913 would require a large amount of energy due to the extreme difference between inside and outside air temperatures. A few feet below the earth's surface, however, the ground remains at a relatively constant temperature. Utilizing this large source of relatively moderate temperature earth, a heating or cooling system's capacity can often be significantly reduced. Although ground temperatures vary according to latitude, at 6 feet (1.8 m) underground, temperatures generally only range from 45 to 75 °F (7 to 24 °C).

Window unit air conditioners are installed in an open window. The interior air is cooled as a fan blows it over the evaporator. On the exterior the heat drawn from the interior is dissipated into the environment as a second fan blows outside air over the condenser. A large house or building may have several such units, allowing each room to be cooled separately.
This is probably the most common question we hear. To give an accurate price, we need to get a safety certified technician out to your home in a fully stocked truck to take a look at your particular situation. Our technician will give you a precise price with your options BEFORE any work begins. Each of our technicians are well trained, experienced, drug tested and background checked so that you can rest easy knowing your services will be performed in a timely and professional manner. If you need help paying for your services, we even offer financing with approved credit through Wells Fargo. Click here to learn more about our financing services.
In the event of an emergency with your residential heating and cooling system, we understand that you simply cannot wait! At R.S. Andrews, we take your comfort and well-being seriously and are proud to offer our emergency HVAC repair at any hour, on any day—including weekends! We provide only the highest quality services to ensure your needs are met!
Absorption refrigerator Air barrier Air conditioning Antifreeze Automobile air conditioning Autonomous building Building insulation materials Central heating Central solar heating Chilled beam Chilled water Constant air volume (CAV) Coolant Dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) Deep water source cooling Demand-controlled ventilation (DCV) Displacement ventilation District cooling District heating Electric heating Energy recovery ventilation (ERV) Firestop Forced-air Forced-air gas Free cooling Heat recovery ventilation (HRV) Hybrid heat Hydronics HVAC Ice storage air conditioning Kitchen ventilation Mixed-mode ventilation Microgeneration Natural ventilation Passive cooling Passive house Radiant heating and cooling system Radiant cooling Radiant heating Radon mitigation Refrigeration Renewable heat Room air distribution Solar air heat Solar combisystem Solar cooling Solar heating Thermal insulation Underfloor air distribution Underfloor heating Vapor barrier Vapor-compression refrigeration (VCRS) Variable air volume (VAV) Variable refrigerant flow (VRF) Ventilation
American design standards are legislated in the Uniform Mechanical Code or International Mechanical Code. In certain states, counties, or cities, either of these codes may be adopted and amended via various legislative processes. These codes are updated and published by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) or the International Code Council (ICC) respectively, on a 3-year code development cycle. Typically, local building permit departments are charged with enforcement of these standards on private and certain public properties.
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