When your home or workplace is too hot or too cold, no one is happy. We have the expertise to solve any temperature problems you may have. We also realize that temperature isn’t the only factor in comfort: ventilation, indoor air quality, and automation also play a role in making your indoor environment a haven for your family, customers and employees.
HVAC repair technicians are properly qualified to take care of anything that relates to installing, maintaining or repairing your heating, air conditioning and refrigeration systems. Our professionals have gone through rigorous training and certification and all our technicians and equipment installers are NATE-certified, which involves demanding testing and indicates a solid understanding of the industry.
If you already have a newer condenser, the worst noise is probably coming from the compressor. (Fans on newer units are very quiet.) Contact the manufacturer to find a sound blanket for your model or buy a universal blanket (search online for “compressor sound blanket”). Installation is easy. Don’t bother putting a blanket on an old unit—you’ll still hear the noisy fan. Here are other possible solutions for a noisy air conditioner.
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Our goal is to make you more comfortable in your home. When your furnace, central air conditioner, heat pump or boiler stops working and you need service, call the professionals at BGE HOME. Heating and cooling system breakdowns occur at the most inconvenient times, so rely on our certified, skilled technicians to make the repair quickly and correctly the first time.

In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]
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