You might guess it from the name: the heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually heats the air your blower motor pushes through the furnace. It consists of a chamber in which the heat energy produced by natural or propane gas is transferred to the forced air. At the same time, this part also includes a vent through which the gases themselves are safely removed from the unit and the air that enters your home. Because of these gases, a problem with your heat exchanger needs to be dealt with promptly. Over time, cracks in the exchanger can result in carbon monoxide leaks. Taking care of the problem once again means understanding the existence of a range: repairing your heat exchanger can cost as little as $100, but a full replacement may cost up to $1,200.
In hot weather, air conditioning can prevent heat stroke, dehydration from excessive sweating and other problems related to hyperthermia. Heat waves are the most lethal type of weather phenomenon in developed countries. Air conditioning (including filtration, humidification, cooling and disinfection) can be used to provide a clean, safe, hypoallergenic atmosphere in hospital operating rooms and other environments where proper atmosphere is critical to patient safety and well-being. It is sometimes recommended for home use by people with allergies.
Air conditioner equipment power in the U.S. is often described in terms of "tons of refrigeration", with each approximately equal to the cooling power of one short ton (2000 pounds or 907 kilograms) of ice melting in a 24-hour period. The value is defined as 12,000 BTU per hour, or 3517 watts.[32] Residential central air systems are usually from 1 to 5 tons (3.5 to 18 kW) in capacity.
1) Your air conditioner is not working at all. Before calling in a professional to address this issue, you may want to check a few things yourself. Check to see if your thermostat is set to “cool”. Confirm that your designated cooling temperature is less than the temperature of the room or home. If everything is set correctly, check the electrical panel to be sure you do not have a tripped breaker. If these things all check out and your air condition unit is still not working, it is time to call in a professional.
Your HVAC professional can also help you verify that your system is properly matched by providing you with an AHRI Certificate of Certified Product Performance upon request. The certificate verifies that the outdoor unit (condenser) and the indoor unit (evaporator) combination has been certified as a matched system by the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI). For higher efficiency systems, this certification may help you obtain a rebate from your utility or local municipality if you have to replace your unit in whole or in part. Not all areas offer a rebate, but your technician will likely be able to provide information about the certification process. Fees for performing this certification vary, but generally are relatively inexpensive.
I have a very old HVAC. The heater went out. I had just purchased the heater check package from Angie's list and it went out the nex tday. I called them and John came within a day or so. He found the problem after checking several items (fuse in heater shorting). He ordered the part and there was a delay due to getting the part and then the ice storm. As soon as the part was in John texted me. When I was available, John came back in a reasonable time and fixed it. He always called half hour before he was en route to notify me and was very punctual. He is professional and knowledgeable. He used my coupon toward my total bill and I have heat! I will use him again and am thankful he could get out and get it fixed at a reasonable cost.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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