In 1906, Stuart W. Cramer of Charlotte was exploring ways to add moisture to the air in his textile mill. Cramer coined the term "air conditioning", using it in a patent claim he filed that year as an analogue to "water conditioning", then a well-known process for making textiles easier to process. He combined moisture with ventilation to "condition" and change the air in the factories, controlling the humidity so necessary in textile plants. Willis Carrier adopted the term and incorporated it into the name of his company.[10]
Most modern air-conditioning systems feature a dehumidification cycle during which the compressor runs while the fan is slowed as much as possible[citation needed] to reduce the evaporator temperature and therefore condense more water. When the temperature falls below a threshold, both the fan and compressor are shut off to mitigate further temperature drops;[clarification needed] this prevents moisture on the evaporator from being blown back into the room.[citation needed] When the temperature rises again,[clarification needed] the compressor restarts and the fan returns to low speed.
Many heating and air conditioning companies are only interested in selling you equipment and service agreements. We’re interested in doing what’s best for our customers and in building and maintaining life-long relationships. With more than 55 years of service to the Tulsa, Oklahoma area, you can rest assured that our reputation and longevity speak for itself. We are easy to do business with!

Recent Review: The service call went well. Fixed a simple problem with my furnace and then during the A/C check up, they found that the smaller compressor needed replacement. It's two years old so thought it was under warranty and determined that it was, so they took care of that for me. Each time I've used these guys, I've been pleased with their service, professionalism and punctuality. Plus the call I get from the office saying the service person is on the way to my home. That way I don't have to take half a day off work to meet the service person.
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Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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