The fan limit switch controls the furnace blower. The fan limit switch has three settings: “Fan On”, “Fan Off”, and “Limit”. In the “Fan Off” setting, the blower will only operate if there is warm air in the plenum to prevent cool air from blowing into the home. The “Fan On” setting will keep the blower operating even after the burner has shutdown, making sure that all of the hot air produced is circulated. The “Limit” setting is a safety control that will turn the burner off in the rare event that the air in the warm air plenum reaches an unsafe temperature. This may be the case if ducts are blocked or if the system controls are malfunctioning.

Modern refrigerants have been developed to be more environmentally safe than many of the early chlorofluorocarbon-based refrigerants used in the early- and mid-twentieth century. These include HCFCs (R-22, as used in most U.S. homes before 2011) and HFCs (R-134a, used in most cars) have replaced most CFC use. HCFCs, in turn, are supposed to have been in the process of being phased out under the Montreal Protocol and replaced by HFCs such as R-410A, which lack chlorine.[14] HFCs, however, contribute to climate change problems. Moreover, policy and political influence by corporate executives resisted change.[15][16] Corporations insisted that no alternatives to HFCs existed. The environmental organization Greenpeace provided funding to a former East German refrigerator company to research an alternative ozone- and climate-safe refrigerant in 1992. The company developed a hydrocarbon mix of isopentane and isobutane, but as a condition of the contract with Greenpeace could not patent the technology, which led to its widespread adoption by other firms.[17][18][19] Their activist marketing first in Germany led to companies like Whirlpool, Bosch, and later LG and others to incorporate the technology throughout Europe, then Asia, although the corporate executives resisted in Latin America, so that it arrived in Argentina produced by a domestic firm in 2003, and then finally with giant Bosch's production in Brazil by 2004.[20][21]


HVAC repair technicians are properly qualified to take care of anything that relates to installing, maintaining or repairing your heating, air conditioning and refrigeration systems. Our professionals have gone through rigorous training and certification and all our technicians and equipment installers are NATE-certified, which involves demanding testing and indicates a solid understanding of the industry.
We want to compliment your fine sales and installation team. They are outstanding. Carlos, your sales rep., was highly informative. We reviewed our needs and we ultimately chose the Trane XV-18 variable speed system. Carlos did not try to up sell us with things that we did not need but he did help us choose the correct upgraded filter and UV light that we wanted. We told Carlos that our research indicated that the quality of the installation of the unit was at least as important as the unit itself, and Carlos agreed. Carlos pointed out that new proper sized duct work and copper wiring would be required for a correct installation, and that we needed to add two more returns. We asked if more returns were needed and Carlos said that would not be cost effective. That was great to hear. Carlos assured us that the installation team of Willie and Gary, both lead installers, would be used. They were both superb. They came on time and worked for 12 and 1/2 hours. It was a 93 degree day so the heat in the attic was intense. We kept telling them to take a break but they continued to work up there in what must have been 130+ temperatures. They were amazing! They were neat and cleaned up any mess they made. They patiently answered all of our many questions and gave us helpful tips. They were truly professional in all respects. We also note that Stacy, Angie and Karen of your office staff were each courteous, accommodating and efficient. They helped things to go smoothly. Carlos, Gary, Stacy, Angie, Willie and Karen are each great assets to your company. We would be comfortable recommending that team of people to anyone! Ken and Kathy Luban
In 1906, Stuart W. Cramer of Charlotte was exploring ways to add moisture to the air in his textile mill. Cramer coined the term "air conditioning", using it in a patent claim he filed that year as an analogue to "water conditioning", then a well-known process for making textiles easier to process. He combined moisture with ventilation to "condition" and change the air in the factories, controlling the humidity so necessary in textile plants. Willis Carrier adopted the term and incorporated it into the name of his company.[10]
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?
Air changes per hour Bake-out Building envelope Convection Dilution Domestic energy consumption Enthalpy Fluid dynamics Gas compressor Heat pump and refrigeration cycle Heat transfer Humidity Infiltration Latent heat Noise control Outgassing Particulates Psychrometrics Sensible heat Stack effect Thermal comfort Thermal destratification Thermal mass Thermodynamics Vapour pressure of water
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
Repairs—If something appears to be not working right with your heating and cooling, a professional will examine the whole health of your system. It’s easy to hop on the internet and research information to find our own conclusions, but there could be an additional component or reason why your system isn’t working properly that isn’t clear or recognizable. Consider our own health concerns—you might check out your symptoms online to try and draw your conclusions, but it’s always best to make an appointment with a doctor to receive an expert opinion.
At Horizon Services, we strive to provide all of our customers with the peace of mind that comes from knowing that you have a skilled team on-call for any AC emergencies that may arise. We have more than 300 fully stocked trucks ready to go at a moment's notice. Our Horizon technicians undergo rigorous training, including a mandatory 150 hours of training every year, to ensure that they're always up to date on the latest techniques and HVAC technology. Plus, we perform extensive background checks, including drug and criminal checks, on all of our employees so you don't have to worry about letting a stranger into your home when your AC breaks down in the middle of the night. When you're dealing with an air conditioning emergency, trust the experts at Horizon Services! 
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