My experience with Cody & Sons was an A+! I am always concerned with these companies taking advantage and charging more than they should. My technician, Mike, was on time, extremely professional and really knew his job. Prior to Cody & Sons, I had 5 other name brand HVAC companies service my furnace but no one could tell me why I smelled gas each time I turned my unit on. Several tried to sell me a new furnace. Mike thoroughly examined my unit and determined what the problem was. He then patiently explained it all to me in laymen's terms. I approved the work and Mike took care of it. I can't express the relief I feel knowing that my furnace is safe again and I am not inhaling fumes!!! From start to finish Mike took about an hour. The price I was charged was very fair! I am happy to say that I have finally found my go to HVAC company. THANK YOU, MIKE and Cody & Sons!!!

Vredevoogd Heating & Cooling technicians routinely assist our customers to figure out when it’s time to upgrade their Heating or Cooling system. Naturally, repairs are part of routine maintenance over the years. However, new models can save homeowners in a big way on energy expenses with their energy-efficient makeup. When you are ready to get a new system, we will do a careful check of your energy needs so that you can select the ideal system for your home’s needs. The wrong HVAC system for your home is a 15 year mistake that no one should have to afford. We install the right system for your home. Moreover, we offer guarantees that you won’t find just anywhere else. If your new installation isn’t right for your home, we’ll remove it free of charge at any time within that first year and refund 100% of your money. Our customers are burdened with no risks. We take on the risk because we are that sure of our expertise. We back our work with the strongest warranties in the field. In fact, we offer a wide array of warranties to provide you with the peace of mind you deserve as a valued Vredevoogd Heating & Cooling Grand Rapids MI customer.
If you’re looking to maintain, replace, or repair your home or business’s air conditioning system, “Make the Precision Decision”™ and give us a call. We are available 24/7 for all your emergency service needs. Our service area includes Litchfield Park, Mesa, Avondale, Peoria, Phoenix, Chandler, Scottsdale, Sun Lakes, Gilbert, Surprise, Glendale, Tempe, Goodyear and surrounding areas.
Starting to feel the damp Florida Summer Heat? Without understanding the science, you may think putting in a bigger unit will give you more substantial cooling, but a unit that is not properly sized will cost you more and could cause major humidity problems in your home! Where comfort meets efficiency, that is where you’ll find Ferran, your home performance contractor!
A mini-split system typically supplies air conditioned and heated air to a single or a few rooms of a building.[38] Multi-zone systems are a common application of ductless systems and allow up to 8 rooms (zones) to be conditioned from a single outdoor unit. Multi-zone systems typically offer a variety of indoor unit styles including wall-mounted, ceiling-mounted, ceiling recessed, and horizontal ducted. Mini-split systems typically produce 9,000 to 36,000 Btu (9,500–38,000 kJ) per hour of cooling. Multi-zone systems provide extended cooling and heating capacity up to 60,000 Btu's.
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that all technicians who open a system containing a controlled refrigerant be certified to do so. There are four levels of certification, one of which is a “universal” certification to allow the HVAC technician to work on any type of equipment containing refrigerant. Your HVAC technician should be certified as “Level II Certified” at a minimum or, preferably, “Universal Certification” to work on your central air conditioner. Obtaining this certification information from your professional HVAC technician may be required in the event you are working with a realtor to sell your home. Costs for certification average $40 to $240.
Without proper ventilation, carbon monoxide can be lethal at concentrations of 1000 ppm (0.1%). However, at several hundred ppm, carbon monoxide exposure induces headaches, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. Carbon monoxide binds with hemoglobin in the blood, forming carboxyhemoglobin, reducing the blood's ability to transport oxygen. The primary health concerns associated with carbon monoxide exposure are its cardiovascular and neurobehavioral effects. Carbon monoxide can cause atherosclerosis (the hardening of arteries) and can also trigger heart attacks. Neurologically, carbon monoxide exposure reduces hand to eye coordination, vigilance, and continuous performance. It can also affect time discrimination.[15]
The selection of indoor units has one restriction: their total power should not exceed the capacity of the outdoor unit. In practice, however, it is very common to see a multi-split system with a total capacity of indoor units greater than the outdoor capacity by at least 20%. However, it is wrong to expect better performance when all indoor units are turned on at the same time, since the total capacity of the whole system is limited by the capacity of the outdoor unit. Simply put, the outdoor unit will distribute all its power to all operating indoor units in such a way that some of the rooms may not have a very comfortable temperature level. However, the calculation of the total power is not simple, since it takes into account not only the nominal power of the units, but also the cooling capacity, heating, dehumidification, humidification, venting, etc.
In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]
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