Demand controlled kitchen ventilation (DCKV) is a building controls approach of slowing down kitchen exhaust fans and subsequent supply air in response to the actual cooking loads in a commercial kitchen. Traditional commercial kitchen ventilation systems operate at 100% fan speed independent of the volume of cooking activity and DCKV technology changes that to provide significant fan energy and conditioned air savings. By deploying smart sensing technology, both the exhaust and supply fans can be controlled to capitalize on the Law of Affinity for motor energy savings, reduce makeup air heating and cooling energy, increasing safety and reducing ambient kitchen noise levels.[30]
In 1995, Germany made CFC refrigerators illegal.[22] DuPont and other companies blocked the refrigerant in the U.S. with the U.S. EPA, disparaging the approach as "that German technology".[21][23] Nevertheless, in 2004, Greenpeace worked with multinational corporations like Coca-Cola and Unilever, and later Pepsico and others, to create a corporate coalition called Refrigerants Naturally!.[22][24] Then, four years later, Ben & Jerry's of Unilever and General Electric began to take steps to support production and use in the U.S.[25] In 2011 the EPA decided in favor of the ozone- and climate-safe refrigerant for U.S. manufacture.[17][26][27]
Modern air conditioning systems are not designed to draw air into the room from the outside, they only recirculate the increasingly cool air on the inside. Because this inside air always has some amount of moisture suspended in it, the cooling portion of the process always causes ambient warm water vapor to condense on the cooling coils and to drip from them down onto a catch tray at the bottom of the unit from which it must then be routed outside, usually through a drain hole. As this moisture has no dissolved minerals in it, it will not cause mineral buildup on the coils. This will happen even if the ambient humidity level is low. If ice begins to form on the evaporative fins, it will reduce circulation efficiency and cause the development of more ice, etc. A clean and strong circulatory fan can help prevent this, as will raising the target cool temperature of the unit's thermostat to a point that the compressor is allowed to turn off occasionally. A failing thermistor may also cause this problem. Refrigerators without a defrost cycle may have this same issue. Dust can also cause the fins to begin blocking air flow with the same undesirable result: ice.
Repairs—If something appears to be not working right with your heating and cooling, a professional will examine the whole health of your system. It’s easy to hop on the internet and research information to find our own conclusions, but there could be an additional component or reason why your system isn’t working properly that isn’t clear or recognizable. Consider our own health concerns—you might check out your symptoms online to try and draw your conclusions, but it’s always best to make an appointment with a doctor to receive an expert opinion.
We relocate frequently and one of the biggest hassles of relocating to new areas is finding reputable companies that send qualified technicians to perform work when you need it, whether for annual preventative maintenance or during a house emergency. We’ve been through the process several times and always dread researching and trying new companies. This was our first HVAC call here in northern Virginia. We are in new construction and chose not to use the builder’s sub-contractor for a technician call but looked through Carrier’s website for a local business. Jeremy Garner with HVAC Unlimited responded to our service request the morning following our call. I shadowed him performing work and he was patient while I peppered him with questions. He helped expand my HVAC knowledge in order to be a better property owner of our systems. He performed the work we thought was necessary, in a timely and professional manner, and gave us options for future annual maintenance. HVAC Unlimited is definitely on our list of go-to contractors. 

7) Schedule an annual tune-up with an HVAC professional. A trained HVAC technician can detect most problems before they become major ones. With a cost of around $100 for a routine maintenance call, the benefits will likely outweigh the costs by a considerable margin. A typical tune-up will include various tests to ensure your unit’s internal parts are functioning correctly, as well as a filter check, and a refrigerant charge if needed. Your technician will likely also clear the drain, and clean your unit thoroughly inside and out.
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