The most recognized standards for HVAC design are based on ASHRAE data. The most general of four volumes of the ASHRAE Handbook is Fundamentals; it includes heating and cooling calculations. Each volume of the ASHRAE Handbook is updated every four years. The design professional must consult ASHRAE data for the standards of design and care as the typical building codes provide little to no information on HVAC design practices; codes such as the UMC and IMC do include much detail on installation requirements, however. Other useful reference materials include items from SMACNA, ACGIH, and technical trade journals.
5) Adjust your thermostat. If you are away for long periods every day, adjust your thermostat to a higher temperature for the time you are away. This will lessen the amount of time your unit has to work each day and will lengthen its life cycle. An additional benefit will be a lower utility bill each month. Some newer thermostats allow you to pre-program your thermostat to match your schedule so that your home will still be cool when you arrive. Optimizing your system’s usage will maximize its life in the long term.
With the split system, the evaporator coil is connected to a remote condenser unit using refrigerant piping between an indoor and outdoor unit instead of ducting air directly from the outdoor unit. Indoor units with directional vents mount onto walls, suspended from ceilings, or fit into the ceiling. Other indoor units mount inside the ceiling cavity, so that short lengths of duct handle air from the indoor unit to vents or diffusers around the rooms.
You shouldn’t have to spend any more time in a state of discomfort than is necessary. If you feel like your home’s HVAC isn’t operating as smoothly and efficiently as it should, or you can tell you should be getting more out of your home’s air conditioning system, call Gainesville Mechanical, Inc. for air conditioning unit repair, and we can send someone to your door anytime day or night.
The contactor (relay) and start/run capacitor(s) (see illustration below) fail most often and are inexpensive. So it’s a safe bet to buy and install those parts right away, especially if your air conditioning service unit is older than five years. The condenser fan motor can also fail, but it runs about $150 — hold off buying that unless you’re sure that’s the culprit.

The compressor-based refrigerant systems are air-cooled, meaning they use air to exchange heat, in the same way as a car radiator or typical household air conditioner does. Such a system dehumidifies the air as it cools it. It collects water condensed from the cooled air and produces hot air which must be vented outside the cooled area; doing so transfers heat from the air in the cooled area to the outside air.
Most Michigan HVAC repair companies will often charge a “Travel Charge” or “Diagnosis Fee.” Randazzo calls this fee simply, a “Service Call Fee.” This will be the minimum cost of the repair. It is not recommended to judge a company on how expensive or how cheap their service rates are. In most cases, with larger companies the rates will be higher. This is not because they may have more overhead but simply because of the quality and preparedness of the service that will be preformed.
In the most general sense, air conditioning can refer to any form of technology that modifies the condition of air (heating, (de-) humidification, cooling, cleaning, ventilation, or air movement). In common usage, though, "air conditioning" refers to systems which cool air. In construction, a complete system of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning is referred to as HVAC.[3]
Your furnace's flame sensor is essentially a safety mechanism. As a thin metallic rod in front of the flame inside the unit, it's sole purpose is to confirm that your gas valves only open when a flame actually exists to burn that gas. When the flame sensor stop working, on the other hand, gas leaks can occur. To repair your furnace's flame sensor, expect to spend between $80 and $250. Even a full replacement of this part typically does not go above that range.
No one wants to be stuck in the dead of summer with a broken air conditioner, or in the cold of winter with a broken furnace or boiler. That’s why we’re available any time of day to make your emergency heating and air conditioning repair and get your system up and running as quickly as possible. We’ll show up on time, in uniform and ready to make your HVAC repair right the first time.
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that all technicians who open a system containing a controlled refrigerant be certified to do so. There are four levels of certification, one of which is a “universal” certification to allow the HVAC technician to work on any type of equipment containing refrigerant. Your HVAC technician should be certified as “Level II Certified” at a minimum or, preferably, “Universal Certification” to work on your central air conditioner. Obtaining this certification information from your professional HVAC technician may be required in the event you are working with a realtor to sell your home. Costs for certification average $40 to $240.
Dehumidification (air drying) in an air conditioning system is provided by the evaporator. Since the evaporator operates at a temperature below the dew point, moisture in the air condenses on the evaporator coil tubes. This moisture is collected at the bottom of the evaporator in a pan and removed by piping to a central drain or onto the ground outside.
Here at Brothers Plumbing, Heating, and Electric, we have a Home Care Club that provides members with many benefits. These benefits include: 2 year warranty on all work (drain work is excluded), transferable club membership, no “show up” fees, priority service, 10% discount on repairs, quarterly newsletters, carefree scheduling (we will contact you and remind you when you need service), 2 free furnace/air conditioner filter changes, exclusive coupons, quarterly drawings, 4 on-going safety checks, and a 100% satisfaction guarantee. So if you’d like to join our Home Care Club, then give us a call or click here today.
Air conditioners can create a lot of water because they remove moisture from the air. To get rid of this, they have a [usually plastic] drain pipe that comes out of the side of the air handler. Over time, algae can block this pipe and, when it does, the AC won’t work. In fact, some condensate drains have a float switch that won’t let the AC run if water backs-up. Water can also puddle around the unit or flood the area. To deal with condensate problems, please see Air Conditioner Leaks Water, below.
Most Michigan HVAC repair companies will often charge a “Travel Charge” or “Diagnosis Fee.” Randazzo calls this fee simply, a “Service Call Fee.” This will be the minimum cost of the repair. It is not recommended to judge a company on how expensive or how cheap their service rates are. In most cases, with larger companies the rates will be higher. This is not because they may have more overhead but simply because of the quality and preparedness of the service that will be preformed.
The condensed, pressurized, and still usually somewhat hot liquid refrigerant is next routed through an expansion valve (often nothing more than a pinhole in the system's copper tubing) where it undergoes an abrupt reduction in pressure. That pressure reduction results in flash evaporation of a part of the liquid refrigerant, greatly lowering its temperature. The cold refrigerant is then routed through the evaporator. A fan blows the interior warm air (which is to be cooled) across the evaporator, causing the liquid part of the cold refrigerant mixture to evaporate as well, further lowering the temperature. The warm air is therefore cooled and is pumped by an exhaust fan/ blower into the room. To complete the refrigeration cycle, the refrigerant vapor is routed back into the compressor. In order for the process to have any efficiency, the cooling/evaporative portion of the system must be separated by some kind of physical barrier from the heating/condensing portion, and each portion must have its own fan to circulate its own "kind" of air (either the hot air or the cool air).
You might guess it from the name: the heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually heats the air your blower motor pushes through the furnace. It consists of a chamber in which the heat energy produced by natural or propane gas is transferred to the forced air. At the same time, this part also includes a vent through which the gases themselves are safely removed from the unit and the air that enters your home. Because of these gases, a problem with your heat exchanger needs to be dealt with promptly. Over time, cracks in the exchanger can result in carbon monoxide leaks. Taking care of the problem once again means understanding the existence of a range: repairing your heat exchanger can cost as little as $100, but a full replacement may cost up to $1,200.
5) Your air conditioner is short cycling. It is perfectly normal for your air conditioner to cycle on and off to maintain a set temperature throughout your home. However, if you notice that it is turning on and off more frequently than usual and the outside temperature is not particularly warmer than normal, it is possible that your unit is malfunctioning. Short cycling puts extra stress on your air conditioner, and can cause it to fail if not handled quickly. 
The first air conditioners and refrigerators employed toxic or flammable gases, such as ammonia, methyl chloride, or propane, that could result in fatal accidents when they leaked. Thomas Midgley, Jr. created the first non-flammable, non-toxic chlorofluorocarbon gas, Freon, in 1928. The name is a trademark name owned by DuPont for any chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC), or hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant. The refrigerant names include a number indicating the molecular composition (e.g., R-11, R-12, R-22, R-134A). The blend most used in direct-expansion home and building comfort cooling is an HCFC known as chlorodifluoromethane (R-22).

Heaters are appliances whose purpose is to generate heat (i.e. warmth) for the building. This can be done via central heating. Such a system contains a boiler, furnace, or heat pump to heat water, steam, or air in a central location such as a furnace room in a home, or a mechanical room in a large building. The heat can be transferred by convection, conduction, or radiation.

Many homeowners don't often think of the state of their furnace—that is until, the first cold day of the year comes around and the furnace won't turn on or only blows cold air. Keeping an eye out for common signs of trouble can help you avoid a complete furnace breakdown. Addressing any issues early on can also help you avoid most extensive (and therefore, more expensive) repairs down the road.


We relocate frequently and one of the biggest hassles of relocating to new areas is finding reputable companies that send qualified technicians to perform work when you need it, whether for annual preventative maintenance or during a house emergency. We’ve been through the process several times and always dread researching and trying new companies. This was our first HVAC call here in northern Virginia. We are in new construction and chose not to use the builder’s sub-contractor for a technician call but looked through Carrier’s website for a local business. Jeremy Garner with HVAC Unlimited responded to our service request the morning following our call. I shadowed him performing work and he was patient while I peppered him with questions. He helped expand my HVAC knowledge in order to be a better property owner of our systems. He performed the work we thought was necessary, in a timely and professional manner, and gave us options for future annual maintenance. HVAC Unlimited is definitely on our list of go-to contractors.
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