On average, furnace repair costs $287 nationally, with some homeowners spending as little as $60 while others paying $900 for furnace maintenance. Repairs to an electric furnace can run you $300 or less, while gas furnace repairs can be more complex and range from $375 to $1,200, depending on the what needs service. Most homeowners spend between $131 and $454 to fix their furnace. Here is what you need to know, along with the various factors that could affect the price of your furnace repair.
Whether you have an electric or gas furnace, you shouldn’t have to suffer when your heater is not working. At Sears Home Services, our technicians fix many of the top furnace manufacturers. The issues you may face with your furnace can vary depending on the type of heating system. If you own an electric model and it isn’t working, some of the potential causes include:
It’s a rare occasion for a problem to arise with your heating or cooling equipment at a convenient time. In fact, we’re not even certain such a time exists! That’s why the team at HVAC & Plumbing Unlimited stands ready to provide complete emergency heating and cooling repairs. No matter the time of day or the day itself, we can be on the way and ready to provide prompt, cost-efficient services to our Alexandria clients.* 

Air conditioners can create a lot of water because they remove moisture from the air. To get rid of this, they have a [usually plastic] drain pipe that comes out of the side of the air handler. Over time, algae can block this pipe and, when it does, the AC won’t work. In fact, some condensate drains have a float switch that won’t let the AC run if water backs-up. Water can also puddle around the unit or flood the area. To deal with condensate problems, please see Air Conditioner Leaks Water, below.
Dehumidification (air drying) in an air conditioning system is provided by the evaporator. Since the evaporator operates at a temperature below the dew point, moisture in the air condenses on the evaporator coil tubes. This moisture is collected at the bottom of the evaporator in a pan and removed by piping to a central drain or onto the ground outside.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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