On average, furnace repair costs $287 nationally, with some homeowners spending as little as $60 while others paying $900 for furnace maintenance. Repairs to an electric furnace can run you $300 or less, while gas furnace repairs can be more complex and range from $375 to $1,200, depending on the what needs service. Most homeowners spend between $131 and $454 to fix their furnace. Here is what you need to know, along with the various factors that could affect the price of your furnace repair.
Precision’s technicians are all NATE certified. This is the highest certification in the air conditioning industry. With that, we can take pride in saying that we provide the best AC repair Phoenix residents can get. Our technicians are thoroughly screened and tested before they begin work on your home. Our AC technicians provide top-notch Phoenix air conditioning repair, and proof of that is their ability to repair most every brand of HVAC equipment. These brands include Trane, Bryant, Ruud, Goodman, Amana, Precision, Armstrong, Carrier, Coleman, Honeywell, Janitrol, Lennox, Payne, Rheem, York, Goettl, American Standard along with many more.
Some systems include an "economizer mode", which is sometimes called a "free-cooling mode". When economizing, the control system will open (fully or partially) the outside air damper and close (fully or partially) the return air damper. This will cause fresh, outside air to be supplied to the system. When the outside air is cooler than the demanded cool air, this will allow the demand to be met without using the mechanical supply of cooling (typically chilled water or a direct expansion "DX" unit), thus saving energy. The control system can compare the temperature of the outside air vs. return air, or it can compare the enthalpy of the air, as is frequently done in climates where humidity is more of an issue. In both cases, the outside air must be less energetic than the return air for the system to enter the economizer mode.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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