Gas furnaces and heaters have control shutoffs to prevent gas leaks, but they are not fail-safe. If you smell gas in your house, do not turn any lights on or off, and do not try to shut off the gas leading to the furnace. Get out of the house, leaving the door open, and immediately call the gas company or the fire department to report a leak. Do not re-enter your home.
Ventilation is the process of changing or replacing air in any space to control temperature or remove any combination of moisture, odors, smoke, heat, dust, airborne bacteria, or carbon dioxide, and to replenish oxygen. Ventilation includes both the exchange of air with the outside as well as circulation of air within the building. It is one of the most important factors for maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in buildings. Methods for ventilating a building may be divided into mechanical/forced and natural types.[16]
If your furnace’s motor runs but the blower doesn’t move air, the belt that connects the two probably has broken. Replacing it is an easy fix. First, turn off all power to the unit and turn off the gas at the gas valve that serves the furnace. Remove the door on the front of the furnace cabinet to give you access to the blower (it might be on a slide-out drawer.) Check the number stamped on the belt and get an exact replacement from a home center or heating supply outlet.
Bonney’s NATE certified technicians will troubleshoot and repair your furnace for safe and reliable operation. Our technicians use state of the art tools including video inspection cameras and exhaust gas analyzers to perform thorough, comprehensive diagnostics when equipment is broken. Furthermore, we arrive in a “warehouse on wheels” stocked with many parts to get your furnace repaired as quickly as possible.  For an unexpected heater repair Bonney offers financing to make your comfort affordable.
The first air conditioners and refrigerators employed toxic or flammable gases, such as ammonia, methyl chloride, or propane, that could result in fatal accidents when they leaked. Thomas Midgley, Jr. created the first non-flammable, non-toxic chlorofluorocarbon gas, Freon, in 1928. The name is a trademark name owned by DuPont for any chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC), or hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant. The refrigerant names include a number indicating the molecular composition (e.g., R-11, R-12, R-22, R-134A). The blend most used in direct-expansion home and building comfort cooling is an HCFC known as chlorodifluoromethane (R-22).
At Horizon Services, we strive to provide all of our customers with the peace of mind that comes from knowing that you have a skilled team on-call for any AC emergencies that may arise. We have more than 300 fully stocked trucks ready to go at a moment's notice. Our Horizon technicians undergo rigorous training, including a mandatory 150 hours of training every year, to ensure that they're always up to date on the latest techniques and HVAC technology. Plus, we perform extensive background checks, including drug and criminal checks, on all of our employees so you don't have to worry about letting a stranger into your home when your AC breaks down in the middle of the night. When you're dealing with an air conditioning emergency, trust the experts at Horizon Services!
I have a very old HVAC. The heater went out. I had just purchased the heater check package from Angie's list and it went out the nex tday. I called them and John came within a day or so. He found the problem after checking several items (fuse in heater shorting). He ordered the part and there was a delay due to getting the part and then the ice storm. As soon as the part was in John texted me. When I was available, John came back in a reasonable time and fixed it. He always called half hour before he was en route to notify me and was very punctual. He is professional and knowledgeable. He used my coupon toward my total bill and I have heat! I will use him again and am thankful he could get out and get it fixed at a reasonable cost.
Close all the windows in the house, turn off all the fans and exhaust fans, and shut off the furnace. Light some incense and walk slowly around the outer walls of the house. Anywhere you notice the smoke blowing away from something or being sucked toward something, there’s probably an air leak. Now that you’ve found it, seal it! Here’s how. Here are more ways to improve energy efficiency in your home.
If a heat exchanger cracks or contains holes, leaks can release carbon monoxide into your home. Carbon monoxide is nearly impossible for humans to detect on their own due to its characteristics of being colorless and odorless. Because of this, it is referred to as “The Silent Killer”. Some symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, dizziness, fatigue, nausea and vomiting. It is extremely important to have a HVAC technician perform a furnace inspection annually to prevent problems such as carbon monoxide poisoning. UGI Heating, Cooling & Plumbing offers yearly maintenance packages and service agreements that include yearly maintenance and furnace inspections.
With over 30 years in the Space Coast HVAC industry, the team at Kabran Air Conditioning & Heating knows just how complex and involved commercial heating and cooling systems can be. Our licensed and highly trained technicians are more than prepared to provide the expertise and knowledge that’s required for your business. As a Carrier Factory Authorized Dealer, our team of contractors is always up-to-date on training and more than qualified to handle your commercial heating and air conditioning repairs, installations, and maintenance. We provide a level of comfort and confidence in your AC and heating systems that goes unmatched. Contact the commercial HVAC experts of Cocoa Beach FL, Satellite Beach FL, Cape Canaveral FL, Rockledge FL, Melbourne FL, Merritt Island FL, Viera FL, Indian Harbour Beach FL today!
6) Check your ductwork and seal open spaces. Make sure all your doors and windows are properly sealed to help keep your home cool. Perform a visual inspection of your ductwork occasionally to be sure it is sealed correctly. If the ductwork is not properly sealed, cool air will escape before getting into your home. The less cool air that escapes your home, the less your unit will have to work.
The fan limit switch controls the furnace blower. The fan limit switch has three settings: “Fan On”, “Fan Off”, and “Limit”. In the “Fan Off” setting, the blower will only operate if there is warm air in the plenum to prevent cool air from blowing into the home. The “Fan On” setting will keep the blower operating even after the burner has shutdown, making sure that all of the hot air produced is circulated. The “Limit” setting is a safety control that will turn the burner off in the rare event that the air in the warm air plenum reaches an unsafe temperature. This may be the case if ducts are blocked or if the system controls are malfunctioning.
AC air handler buzzing sounds. Do you hear a buzzing sound when you turn on the thermostat? The only thing that comes on in the house when you turn on the thermostat is the fan relay and fan in the air handler or furnace. Try switching the thermostat HEAT/COOL switch to OFF. Then switch the fan switch from AUTO to ON. The fan (only) should come on. If the air handler makes a buzzing sound, it probably has a bad fan relay or, more likely, blower fan.
Gas furnaces and heaters have control shutoffs to prevent gas leaks, but they are not fail-safe. If you smell gas in your house, do not turn any lights on or off, and do not try to shut off the gas leading to the furnace. Get out of the house, leaving the door open, and immediately call the gas company or the fire department to report a leak. Do not re-enter your home.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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