You might guess it from the name: the heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually heats the air your blower motor pushes through the furnace. It consists of a chamber in which the heat energy produced by natural or propane gas is transferred to the forced air. At the same time, this part also includes a vent through which the gases themselves are safely removed from the unit and the air that enters your home. Because of these gases, a problem with your heat exchanger needs to be dealt with promptly. Over time, cracks in the exchanger can result in carbon monoxide leaks. Taking care of the problem once again means understanding the existence of a range: repairing your heat exchanger can cost as little as $100, but a full replacement may cost up to $1,200.
Vredevoogd Heating & Cooling Grand Rapids employs more than 80 people who are proud to work under the Vredevoogd Heating & Cooling banner. Each team member shares our company values for service excellence. All of our employees are intensely screened and background checked so that you have peace of mind when they enter your home. Moreover, our technicians are certified to work in the HVAC industry and provide the level of expertise that our customers expect from Vredevoogd Heating & Cooling. We back our technicians’ work and continue to make training a priority so that all of our techs are familiar with the latest HVAC models and advances. Our customers deserve the best, so the best is what we deliver to each and every job.
Gainesville Mechanical Inc is open for regular business hours, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. We offer everyday extended business hours, at regular rates, to meet the challenge of your busy schedule with flexible appointment times, and always have a licensed technician at your door within 24 hours.  For desperate times, we protect your home, comfort, and safety with 24/7 Emergency Assistance without added after-hour costs.  Contact us at 770-532-9130, and rest assured, we prioritize your best interests.  Our skilled service never comes with inflated or hidden charges.  We provide affordable rates, upfront pricing, and the detailed information you need to make the best possible decisions.  We service all makes and models of cooling equipment, optimizing safety, efficiency, and reliability, to deliver superior, ongoing performance.  Trust our award-winning team of NATE-certified technicians to restore your comfort today, with repairs that ensure long-term satisfaction.
A heat pump is an air conditioner in which the refrigeration cycle can be reversed, producing heating instead of cooling in the indoor environment. They are also commonly referred to as a "reverse cycle air conditioner". The heat pump is significantly more energy efficient than electric resistance heating. Some homeowners elect to have a heat pump system installed as a feature of a central air conditioner. When the heat pump is in heating mode, the indoor evaporator coil switches roles and becomes the condenser coil, producing heat. The outdoor condenser unit also switches roles to serve as the evaporator, and discharges cold air (colder than the ambient outdoor air).
This job involves removing the access panel, loosening a couple of bolts that hold the blower motor at the proper tension, and adjusting its distance or realigning the belt. In many cases, it’s a good idea to remove the belt and buy a replacement at a home center. Last, when reinstalling the belt, be careful not to over-tighten it; this can wear out the motor bearings.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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