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At Genz-Ryan, we are here for you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week so you can count on us for all your heating repair work in the Minneapolis area. Our furnace repair technicians are well-trained and experienced. They’re ready to take care of any heating issue that you may have. We are a Lennox Premier Furnace Dealer and provide expert furnace repair service for most of the Minneapolis/St. Paul area. For over 60 years we have been getting the job done right the first time.
If your air conditioning is blowing warm air—or not working at all—it's time to call in the experts. After all, we're not just talking about an uncomfortable afternoon on a hot day: we're talking about your happiness at home, and a problem that may cause extensive damage to your system if not addressed quickly. That's why it's smart to catch problems early before they become expensive to address.
When central air conditioning service fails during a heat spell, you may have to wait days for an HVAC repair technician or a ac contractor to show up, and you’ll probably pay at least several hundred for the repair. But if you’re comfortable working around electricity and are willing to spend about $50 on parts, you can probably repair your air conditioning service yourself in about two hours and save about $225 on parts markup and labor.

Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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