A number of other variables can influence your decision on whether to repair or replace your furnace, as well. In addition to cost and brand, consider the expected lifetime of your furnace. If it is more than 15 years old, it might make more sense to invest in a new unit even if it costs more than simply repairing the current problem. Long-term costs also play into the equation. For example, your new furnace may be more energy efficient than the current unit. Even though you will pay more for the actual installation, you might be able to make back your investment through lower energy bills. To make your decision, consult with a reliable professional on what to do. In inspecting your furnace, they will be able to make an informed recommendation that looks not just to the next year, but years into the future. That way, you can make the best possible decision for your home and budget long-term.
Our goal is to make you more comfortable in your home. When your furnace, central air conditioner, heat pump or boiler stops working and you need service, call the professionals at BGE HOME. Heating and cooling system breakdowns occur at the most inconvenient times, so rely on our certified, skilled technicians to make the repair quickly and correctly the first time.
In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]
Air changes per hour Bake-out Building envelope Convection Dilution Domestic energy consumption Enthalpy Fluid dynamics Gas compressor Heat pump and refrigeration cycle Heat transfer Humidity Infiltration Latent heat Noise control Outgassing Particulates Psychrometrics Sensible heat Stack effect Thermal comfort Thermal destratification Thermal mass Thermodynamics Vapour pressure of water
In 1820, English scientist and inventor Michael Faraday discovered that compressing and liquefying ammonia could chill air when the liquefied ammonia was allowed to evaporate. In 1842, Florida physician John Gorrie used compressor technology to create ice, which he used to cool air for his patients in his hospital in Apalachicola, Florida. He hoped to eventually use his ice-making machine to regulate the temperature of buildings. He even envisioned centralized air conditioning that could cool entire cities. Though his prototype leaked and performed irregularly, Gorrie was granted a patent in 1851 for his ice-making machine. Though his process improved the artificial production of ice, his hopes for its success vanished soon afterwards when his chief financial backer died and Gorrie did not get the money he needed to develop the machine. According to his biographer, Vivian M. Sherlock, he blamed the "Ice King", Frederic Tudor, for his failure, suspecting that Tudor had launched a smear campaign against his invention. Dr. Gorrie died impoverished in 1855, and the dream of commonplace air conditioning went away for 50 years.[citation needed]

In 1995, Germany made CFC refrigerators illegal.[22] DuPont and other companies blocked the refrigerant in the U.S. with the U.S. EPA, disparaging the approach as "that German technology".[21][23] Nevertheless, in 2004, Greenpeace worked with multinational corporations like Coca-Cola and Unilever, and later Pepsico and others, to create a corporate coalition called Refrigerants Naturally!.[22][24] Then, four years later, Ben & Jerry's of Unilever and General Electric began to take steps to support production and use in the U.S.[25] In 2011 the EPA decided in favor of the ozone- and climate-safe refrigerant for U.S. manufacture.[17][26][27]


As a Carrier Factory Authorized Dealer and President’s award winner, we specialize in world-recognized, award-winning, and technologically advanced heating, cooling and air quality products. From air conditioning and heat pumps to furnaces and boilers, you’re going to benefit from increased energy efficiency, decreased sound levels and innovative features that make everyday life easier, more enjoyable and far more comfortable. We provide FREE estimates and flexible financing opportunities. Our goal is to maximize value, sustainability and long-term customer satisfaction.
At Horizon Services, we strive to provide all of our customers with the peace of mind that comes from knowing that you have a skilled team on-call for any AC emergencies that may arise. We have more than 300 fully stocked trucks ready to go at a moment's notice. Our Horizon technicians undergo rigorous training, including a mandatory 150 hours of training every year, to ensure that they're always up to date on the latest techniques and HVAC technology. Plus, we perform extensive background checks, including drug and criminal checks, on all of our employees so you don't have to worry about letting a stranger into your home when your AC breaks down in the middle of the night. When you're dealing with an air conditioning emergency, trust the experts at Horizon Services!
×