We had an exceptional experience with Gator Air, in particular Carlos. He presented us with quotes for different types of AC units, told us facts about said units and left us to make our decision. No high pressure sales. The installers were professional and cleaned up when they were through. A nice surprise was the 1 year free maintenance of the unit. We belonged to the Gator Club so to not have to pay it for the next year was an added bonus. Thank you GatorAir for making the experience an enjoyable one.
Whether in your home or business, we can get your air conditioner working again in no time! Randazzo Heating, Cooling, and Fireplaces has a staff of experienced technicians who will come to your rescue! We can also keep you updated on when your air conditioner should have routine maintenance inspections, so you can keep it performing at optimum efficiency.

In variable climates, the system may include a reversing valve that switches from heating in winter to cooling in summer. By reversing the flow of refrigerant, the heat pump refrigeration cycle is changed from cooling to heating or vice versa. This allows a facility to be heated and cooled by a single piece of equipment by the same means, and with the same hardware.
Many disconnect blocks contain two cartridge fuses. Check them before you proceed with repairs (Photo 3). A blown fuse is a sign of a failing part inside the condensing unit. So don’t just replace it and think you’ve solved the problem. Instead, replace the parts we show here. Then install new fuses and fire up the unit. If it blows again, call a pro—you’ve got more serious issues.

Your furnace's flame sensor is essentially a safety mechanism. As a thin metallic rod in front of the flame inside the unit, it's sole purpose is to confirm that your gas valves only open when a flame actually exists to burn that gas. When the flame sensor stop working, on the other hand, gas leaks can occur. To repair your furnace's flame sensor, expect to spend between $80 and $250. Even a full replacement of this part typically does not go above that range.
A specialized air conditioner that is used only for dehumidifying is called a dehumidifier. It also uses a refrigeration cycle, but differs from a standard air conditioner in that both the evaporator and the condenser are placed in the same air path. A standard air conditioner transfers heat energy out of the room because its condenser coil releases heat outside. However, since all components of the dehumidifier are in the same room, no heat energy is removed. Instead, the electric power consumed by the dehumidifier remains in the room as heat, so the room is actually heated, just as by an electric heater that draws the same amount of power.

In the United States, HVAC engineers generally are members of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), EPA Universal CFC certified (for installation and service of CFC HVAC devices), or locally engineer certified such as a Special to Chief Boilers License issued by the state or, in some jurisdictions, the city. ASHRAE is an international technical society for all individuals and organizations interested in HVAC. The Society, organized into regions, chapters, and student branches, allows exchange of HVAC knowledge and experiences for the benefit of the field's practitioners and the public. ASHRAE provides many opportunities to participate in the development of new knowledge via, for example, research and its many technical committees. These committees typically meet twice per year at the ASHRAE Annual and Winter Meetings. A popular product show, the AHR Expo, is held in conjunction with each winter meeting. The Society has approximately 50,000 members and has headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia.


During the colder months of the year, the comfort of your home depends on the proper working function of your heating system. When your furnace breaks down or stops working properly, reach out to the heating experts at Horizon Services! We have nearly 30 years of experience providing reliable furnace repairs for homeowners throughout Delaware, Southern New Jersey, Southeastern Pennsylvania, and Northeastern Maryland. Our technicians are able to repair just about any type of home furnace using cutting-edge techniques and state-of-the-art tools. We can accurately diagnose the root of the issue and quickly get to work making the necessary repairs. We even offer same day service at no additional cost!
When natural gas, propane or heating oil are burned in a furnace, the resulting hot combustion gasses by burning natural gas, propane or heating oil circulate through a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger will, in turn, release that heat to be circulated by the furnace’s blower. The flue gas then travels through the flue vent, which carries the gas outside of the home. When a heat exchanger is cracked, it generally will require a complete system replacement. That is one of the reasons why we highly recommend annual preventive maintenance on your home’s furnace – this preventative furnace inspection and maintenance can greatly prolong the life of your home heating system.
Nobody wants to deal with a broken furnace in winter. Lucky for you, our Denver furnace repair specialists are available 7 days a week. Don’t face cold winter nights without a well functioning furnace. Contact us, your Denver furnace repair company so that we can diagnose the problem and set you up with a preventative maintenance package so we can catch problems before they occur. Click HERE to learn more about our furnace related services.
1) Change your filter. The simplest and most effective way to keep your AC running smoothly is changing your filter once a month. By regularly changing your filter, you reduce a lot of the burden on your system. A dirty or clogged filter makes your air conditioner work much harder than does a clean filter. Changing your filters regularly is easy on your budget and easy on your system as well. It will lower your utility bill and extend the life of your AC.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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