This type of furnace is fueled by liquid propane gas, which is burned to push hot air through your home. A pilot light ignites the burners within a combustion chamber, which push heat into the heat exchanger and eventually through your entire home. Repairing this type of furnace can be more expensive than its electric alternative. For example here are some common propane gas repairs and their costs:
Given the broad price ranges above, it's easy to recognize that the cost of your furnace repair varies drastically based on which parts need attention. As a result, it makes sense to gain a better understanding of the parts that heat your home, and how much they cost to repair. Repairing or replacing your furnace’s blower motor can cost you anywhere between $150 and $450, depending on the extent of the damage. Heat exchanger repair costs can vary greatly, from as little as $100 for a simple fix to as much as $1,200 for a full replacement. Repairing a furnace igniter will only cost you $300 at most, while flame sensor repairs generally fall between $80 to $250. The average cost to repair your Thermostat will range from $108 to $282.
When natural gas, propane or heating oil are burned in a furnace, the resulting hot combustion gasses by burning natural gas, propane or heating oil circulate through a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger will, in turn, release that heat to be circulated by the furnace’s blower. The flue gas then travels through the flue vent, which carries the gas outside of the home. When a heat exchanger is cracked, it generally will require a complete system replacement. That is one of the reasons why we highly recommend annual preventive maintenance on your home’s furnace – this preventative furnace inspection and maintenance can greatly prolong the life of your home heating system.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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