The first air conditioners and refrigerators employed toxic or flammable gases, such as ammonia, methyl chloride, or propane, that could result in fatal accidents when they leaked. Thomas Midgley, Jr. created the first non-flammable, non-toxic chlorofluorocarbon gas, Freon, in 1928. The name is a trademark name owned by DuPont for any chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC), or hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant. The refrigerant names include a number indicating the molecular composition (e.g., R-11, R-12, R-22, R-134A). The blend most used in direct-expansion home and building comfort cooling is an HCFC known as chlorodifluoromethane (R-22).
In 1820, English scientist and inventor Michael Faraday discovered that compressing and liquefying ammonia could chill air when the liquefied ammonia was allowed to evaporate. In 1842, Florida physician John Gorrie used compressor technology to create ice, which he used to cool air for his patients in his hospital in Apalachicola, Florida. He hoped to eventually use his ice-making machine to regulate the temperature of buildings. He even envisioned centralized air conditioning that could cool entire cities. Though his prototype leaked and performed irregularly, Gorrie was granted a patent in 1851 for his ice-making machine. Though his process improved the artificial production of ice, his hopes for its success vanished soon afterwards when his chief financial backer died and Gorrie did not get the money he needed to develop the machine. According to his biographer, Vivian M. Sherlock, he blamed the "Ice King", Frederic Tudor, for his failure, suspecting that Tudor had launched a smear campaign against his invention. Dr. Gorrie died impoverished in 1855, and the dream of commonplace air conditioning went away for 50 years.[citation needed]

Heaters are appliances whose purpose is to generate heat (i.e. warmth) for the building. This can be done via central heating. Such a system contains a boiler, furnace, or heat pump to heat water, steam, or air in a central location such as a furnace room in a home, or a mechanical room in a large building. The heat can be transferred by convection, conduction, or radiation.
When the time comes to schedule furnace repairs, you want a team you can trust. Keeping your home warm and comfortable is important for you and your family, which is why you should rely on the highly-trained team of technicians at Horizon Services. Our techs undergo at least 150 hours of technical training every year and are up-to-date on the latest, most advanced techniques in the trade. We also background-check all of our employees to ensure your complete comfort and safety. When you call on us for furnace repair, we will arrive on-time and on schedule, ready to resolve the issue as quickly as possible.
Furnaces and thermostats are not mix-and-match appliances. Using the wrong type of thermostat with a furnace will cause operating problems and can be dangerous. Although thermostats look similar, they are designed very differently. There are numerous types of heating systems and thermostat systems and they need to be coordinated for safe and proper operation. There are three types of thermostat systems used today: millivoltage, low voltage, and line voltage.​
Reinstall the access panel and disconnect block. Turn on the circuit breaker and furnace switch. Then set the thermostat to a lower temperature and wait for the AC to start (see “Be Patient at Startup,” below). The compressor should run and the condenser fan should spin. If the compressor starts but the fan doesn’t, the fan motor is most likely shot. Shut off the power and remove the screws around the condenser cover. Lift the cover and remove the fan blade and motor (photo 7). Reinstall the blade and secure the cover. Then repower the unit and see if the fan starts. If it doesn’t, you’ve given it your best shot—it’s time to call a pro.
Most Michigan HVAC repair companies will often charge a “Travel Charge” or “Diagnosis Fee.” Randazzo calls this fee simply, a “Service Call Fee.” This will be the minimum cost of the repair. It is not recommended to judge a company on how expensive or how cheap their service rates are. In most cases, with larger companies the rates will be higher. This is not because they may have more overhead but simply because of the quality and preparedness of the service that will be preformed.
Leave gambling to the casinos! When it’s 110 degrees in the shade, you don’t want take a chance with a broken AC. Go beyond a tune-up and Rejuuuvenate! your air conditioner back to factory fresh conditions. Your AC shouldn’t sound like a slot machine, so we believe in eliminating every squeak, rattle and hum because if you don’t, bigger problems will come. So trust our highly trained, screened, and “Sadie Certified” technicians to make you the coolest act on the Strip!

Precision’s technicians are all NATE certified. This is the highest certification in the air conditioning industry. With that, we can take pride in saying that we provide the best AC repair Phoenix residents can get. Our technicians are thoroughly screened and tested before they begin work on your home. Our AC technicians provide top-notch Phoenix air conditioning repair, and proof of that is their ability to repair most every brand of HVAC equipment. These brands include Trane, Bryant, Ruud, Goodman, Amana, Precision, Armstrong, Carrier, Coleman, Honeywell, Janitrol, Lennox, Payne, Rheem, York, Goettl, American Standard along with many more.
Our fully trained and certified heating technicians have been repairing installing furnaces, heating systems and heat pumps in Smyrna and the Atlanta area since 1966.  We offer 24 hour emergency service for unexpected heating system break downs.  We can provide expert maintenance and repair on your current heating system or help you select a new, high-efficiency heating system from our wide range of furnaces. 

Variable-speed technology allows more energy saving potential and improved comfort levels throughout the home.  The ability of the system to automatically adjust speeds according to the needs of the home ensures the right amount of comfort control, right when you need it.  Outside temperatures rarely, if ever, require your HVAC system to operate at 100% capacity.  Variable-speed units determine optimal cooling needs and vary speeds in increments between 40% and 100%.  Not only does this tailor comfort, but by running at lower speeds and consuming less power, you’ll save a significant amount off monthly utility expenses.
The cost to replace your gas furnace will vary based on the type and size of furnace you select, labor and installation costs, and any repairs your HVAC system may need. Nationally, average HVAC prices for a heating specialist range between $1,800 and $2,500. It’s important to select the right size gas furnace for your heating needs. A furnace that’s too small won’t heat your house properly, while a furnace that’s too large will run inefficiently, cycling on and off and likely breaking down sooner. HVAC specialists calculate your exact heat needs by measuring your home and incorporating variables such as the regional climate and your home’s level of insulation. Retail pricing for gas furnaces can range from $650 up to $3,000 and more. The higher the AFUE (annual fuel utilization efficiency) rating of the furnace, the more efficient it is at turning fuel into heat and the lower your carbon footprint and utility bill will be. HVAC installation costs are often based on an hourly rate and can range from under $50 to over $100 per hour, depending on the company and the furnace being installed. Higher-end furnaces cost more to install because they require added labor and expertise. For a typical installation, it might take two HVAC installation pros one day or less to remove your old furnace and replace it with a new one.
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