When your furnace isn’t regularly serviced it can operate less efficiently. This increases your energy bills and also prevents your furnace from keeping your home as warm as you like. Keep your furnace properly maintained with regular service. The national average furnace service cost is between $60 and $80. Companies may offer tuneup specials that cover all the necessary testing, tightening, measuring and cleaning to keep your equipment running at top efficiency. If you have a newer system, furnace service costs may be covered by your warranty. Outside of warranty, a basic tuneup might start at $58 and a more advanced maintenance cleaning could be over $120. Here are some signs your furnace may need service:

Brothers Plumbing, Heating, and Electric have been performing Denver furnace repair for over 30 years. Our family owned and operated company was founded in 1980 and we employ specially trained furnace repair technicians who continuously provide prompt, professional, quality service. We provide top of the line customer service and a guarantee on the work done. Your search for reliable Denver furnace repair ends here.
The concrete pads under home air conditioner and heat exchanger units tend to settle over the years. As long as there’s no strain on the copper coolant tubes and electrical lines, and the unit stays dry and level, it’s OK that the pad has sunk. But if it continues to sink and pulls the lines tight, or if water puddles around the unit, you’ll need to take action. Here’s how to fix it.
In 1820, English scientist and inventor Michael Faraday discovered that compressing and liquefying ammonia could chill air when the liquefied ammonia was allowed to evaporate. In 1842, Florida physician John Gorrie used compressor technology to create ice, which he used to cool air for his patients in his hospital in Apalachicola, Florida. He hoped to eventually use his ice-making machine to regulate the temperature of buildings. He even envisioned centralized air conditioning that could cool entire cities. Though his prototype leaked and performed irregularly, Gorrie was granted a patent in 1851 for his ice-making machine. Though his process improved the artificial production of ice, his hopes for its success vanished soon afterwards when his chief financial backer died and Gorrie did not get the money he needed to develop the machine. According to his biographer, Vivian M. Sherlock, he blamed the "Ice King", Frederic Tudor, for his failure, suspecting that Tudor had launched a smear campaign against his invention. Dr. Gorrie died impoverished in 1855, and the dream of commonplace air conditioning went away for 50 years.[citation needed]
Air conditioner equipment power in the U.S. is often described in terms of "tons of refrigeration", with each approximately equal to the cooling power of one short ton (2000 pounds or 907 kilograms) of ice melting in a 24-hour period. The value is defined as 12,000 BTU per hour, or 3517 watts.[32] Residential central air systems are usually from 1 to 5 tons (3.5 to 18 kW) in capacity.
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