In very dry climates, evaporative coolers, sometimes referred to as swamp coolers or desert coolers, are popular for improving coolness during hot weather. An evaporative cooler is a device that draws outside air through a wet pad, such as a large sponge soaked with water. The sensible heat of the incoming air, as measured by a dry bulb thermometer, is reduced. The temperature of the incoming air is reduced, but it is also more humid, so the total heat (sensible heat plus latent heat) is unchanged. Some of the sensible heat of the entering air is converted to latent heat by the evaporation of water in the wet cooler pads. If the entering air is dry enough, the results can be quite substantial.
Here at Brothers Plumbing, Heating, and Electric, we have a Home Care Club that provides members with many benefits. These benefits include: 2 year warranty on all work (drain work is excluded), transferable club membership, no “show up” fees, priority service, 10% discount on repairs, quarterly newsletters, carefree scheduling (we will contact you and remind you when you need service), 2 free furnace/air conditioner filter changes, exclusive coupons, quarterly drawings, 4 on-going safety checks, and a 100% satisfaction guarantee. So if you’d like to join our Home Care Club, then give us a call or click here today.

Ground source, or geothermal, heat pumps are similar to ordinary heat pumps, but instead of transferring heat to or from outside air, they rely on the stable, even temperature of the earth to provide heating and air conditioning. Many regions experience seasonal temperature extremes, which would require large-capacity heating and cooling equipment to heat or cool buildings. For example, a conventional heat pump system used to heat a building in Montana's −70 °F (−57 °C) low temperature or cool a building in the highest temperature ever recorded in the US—134 °F (57 °C) in Death Valley, California, in 1913 would require a large amount of energy due to the extreme difference between inside and outside air temperatures. A few feet below the earth's surface, however, the ground remains at a relatively constant temperature. Utilizing this large source of relatively moderate temperature earth, a heating or cooling system's capacity can often be significantly reduced. Although ground temperatures vary according to latitude, at 6 feet (1.8 m) underground, temperatures generally only range from 45 to 75 °F (7 to 24 °C).
We were visiting our Arizona home from New York, when on one of the hottest days in August the air conditioning was not working. We called Precision & James Shelton worked to get the air up & running in no time. He was courteous & sympathetic, working hard to repair our central air…we have a warranty & Precision stands behind their work, they are available 24/7… Thank you!
We happily offer all of our services in St Marys county. We view our neighbors in St. Mary’s county as important and valuable as our friends in Calvert. If you live in St Marys and you’re not sure if we can help you with your specific problem, please don’t hesitate to contact us and find out! We value all inquiries and our eager to help and assist our neighbors throughout all of Southern Maryland.
Vacuum the fins of your AC unit clean with a soft-bristle brush. Note: they’re fragile and can easily be bent or crushed. On many units you’ll have to unscrew and lift off a metal box to get at them. Check your owner’s manual for directions and lift off the box carefully to avoid bumping the fins. Follow these other steps to safely clean your home air conditioner for better efficiency.
In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]
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