As a locally owned and operated HVAC contractor we are not owned by anyone else but ourselves. This allows us to keep our prices reasonable. It also allows us to keep our responses personal and our service reliable because we directly answer to each of our customers. If we send one of our technicians to service a call anywhere in Southern Maryland, we recognize that their customer service is a direct reflection on our business name – so we want your satisfaction to be 100%.
In the event of an emergency with your residential heating and cooling system, we understand that you simply cannot wait! At R.S. Andrews, we take your comfort and well-being seriously and are proud to offer our emergency HVAC repair at any hour, on any day—including weekends! We provide only the highest quality services to ensure your needs are met!
In 1820, English scientist and inventor Michael Faraday discovered that compressing and liquefying ammonia could chill air when the liquefied ammonia was allowed to evaporate. In 1842, Florida physician John Gorrie used compressor technology to create ice, which he used to cool air for his patients in his hospital in Apalachicola, Florida. He hoped to eventually use his ice-making machine to regulate the temperature of buildings. He even envisioned centralized air conditioning that could cool entire cities. Though his prototype leaked and performed irregularly, Gorrie was granted a patent in 1851 for his ice-making machine. Though his process improved the artificial production of ice, his hopes for its success vanished soon afterwards when his chief financial backer died and Gorrie did not get the money he needed to develop the machine. According to his biographer, Vivian M. Sherlock, he blamed the "Ice King", Frederic Tudor, for his failure, suspecting that Tudor had launched a smear campaign against his invention. Dr. Gorrie died impoverished in 1855, and the dream of commonplace air conditioning went away for 50 years.[citation needed]

Recent Review: Frymire did a complete A/C and Furnace install on my property in May 2013.  I had 5 companies bid the job and what sold me on them was their honesty and responsiveness, as well as a fair price.  They were not the lowest, but were willing to negotiate on some unknown repair issues with my duct work, etc.  The team was punctual and very professional, taking extra pains to wear protective footwear on my hardwood floors.  The foreman on the job kept me up to speed about the install throughout the day.   They started at 9 a.m. and were finished and out by 6pm.  I recently had them return for the yearly check-up on my A/C.  The tech was efficient and very professional.  I would highly recommend their service. 
We are committed to providing high quality same-day furnace repair in Denver and strive for 100% customer satisfaction, 7 days a week. All our specialists are drug tested and background checked and our techs use shoe covers and floor mats to keep all homes the same way they found them. You won’t find an equal level of commitment from anyone else compared to our Denver furnace repair specialists.
Central home air conditioner service systems consist of two major components: a condensing unit that sits outside your house, and the evaporator coil (often referred to as an A-coil) that sits in the plenum of your furnace or air handler. The refrigerant in the A-coil picks up the heat from your home and moves it to the outdoor condensing unit. The condensing unit fan blows outside air through the condensing coil to remove the heat. The condensing unit houses the three parts replaceable by a DIYer: the contactor, the start/run capacitor(s) and the condenser fan motor. The condensing unit also houses the compressor, but only a pro can replace that. The A-coil has no parts that can be serviced by a DIYer.

In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]

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