5) Your air conditioner is short cycling. It is perfectly normal for your air conditioner to cycle on and off to maintain a set temperature throughout your home. However, if you notice that it is turning on and off more frequently than usual and the outside temperature is not particularly warmer than normal, it is possible that your unit is malfunctioning. Short cycling puts extra stress on your air conditioner, and can cause it to fail if not handled quickly. 


Many disconnect blocks contain two cartridge fuses. Check them before you proceed with repairs (Photo 3). A blown fuse is a sign of a failing part inside the condensing unit. So don’t just replace it and think you’ve solved the problem. Instead, replace the parts we show here. Then install new fuses and fire up the unit. If it blows again, call a pro—you’ve got more serious issues.
In addition to the information below, see these two articles for the general care and maintenance of your air conditioner: Preparing Your Air Conditioner for Summer and How to Replace Furnace & AC Filters. Most noteworthy, you should replace the filters at least twice a year, before the heating and cooling seasons. For information on furnace problems, please see Furnace Not Working.
In variable climates, the system may include a reversing valve that switches from heating in winter to cooling in summer. By reversing the flow of refrigerant, the heat pump refrigeration cycle is changed from cooling to heating or vice versa. This allows a facility to be heated and cooled by a single piece of equipment by the same means, and with the same hardware.
In the United States, HVAC engineers generally are members of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), EPA Universal CFC certified (for installation and service of CFC HVAC devices), or locally engineer certified such as a Special to Chief Boilers License issued by the state or, in some jurisdictions, the city. ASHRAE is an international technical society for all individuals and organizations interested in HVAC. The Society, organized into regions, chapters, and student branches, allows exchange of HVAC knowledge and experiences for the benefit of the field's practitioners and the public. ASHRAE provides many opportunities to participate in the development of new knowledge via, for example, research and its many technical committees. These committees typically meet twice per year at the ASHRAE Annual and Winter Meetings. A popular product show, the AHR Expo, is held in conjunction with each winter meeting. The Society has approximately 50,000 members and has headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia.
The cost to replace your gas furnace will vary based on the type and size of furnace you select, labor and installation costs, and any repairs your HVAC system may need. Nationally, average HVAC prices for a heating specialist range between $1,800 and $2,500. It’s important to select the right size gas furnace for your heating needs. A furnace that’s too small won’t heat your house properly, while a furnace that’s too large will run inefficiently, cycling on and off and likely breaking down sooner. HVAC specialists calculate your exact heat needs by measuring your home and incorporating variables such as the regional climate and your home’s level of insulation. Retail pricing for gas furnaces can range from $650 up to $3,000 and more. The higher the AFUE (annual fuel utilization efficiency) rating of the furnace, the more efficient it is at turning fuel into heat and the lower your carbon footprint and utility bill will be. HVAC installation costs are often based on an hourly rate and can range from under $50 to over $100 per hour, depending on the company and the furnace being installed. Higher-end furnaces cost more to install because they require added labor and expertise. For a typical installation, it might take two HVAC installation pros one day or less to remove your old furnace and replace it with a new one.

The most recognized standards for HVAC design are based on ASHRAE data. The most general of four volumes of the ASHRAE Handbook is Fundamentals; it includes heating and cooling calculations. Each volume of the ASHRAE Handbook is updated every four years. The design professional must consult ASHRAE data for the standards of design and care as the typical building codes provide little to no information on HVAC design practices; codes such as the UMC and IMC do include much detail on installation requirements, however. Other useful reference materials include items from SMACNA, ACGIH, and technical trade journals.
You might guess it from the name: the heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually heats the air your blower motor pushes through the furnace. It consists of a chamber in which the heat energy produced by natural or propane gas is transferred to the forced air. At the same time, this part also includes a vent through which the gases themselves are safely removed from the unit and the air that enters your home. Because of these gases, a problem with your heat exchanger needs to be dealt with promptly. Over time, cracks in the exchanger can result in carbon monoxide leaks. Taking care of the problem once again means understanding the existence of a range: repairing your heat exchanger can cost as little as $100, but a full replacement may cost up to $1,200.
This job involves removing the access panel, loosening a couple of bolts that hold the blower motor at the proper tension, and adjusting its distance or realigning the belt. In many cases, it’s a good idea to remove the belt and buy a replacement at a home center. Last, when reinstalling the belt, be careful not to over-tighten it; this can wear out the motor bearings.
Ultimately, the cost to repair your furnace depends on a wide range of variables. From the brand of the units to the damaged or broken parts, you need a reliable and trusted professional who can evaluate the issue and recommend next steps. If you're unsure whether to repair or replace your furnace, or even where to begin, connect with a local furnace repair professional who can make sure that your home heats well both now and in the future.
Many disconnect blocks contain two cartridge fuses. Check them before you proceed with repairs (Photo 3). A blown fuse is a sign of a failing part inside the condensing unit. So don’t just replace it and think you’ve solved the problem. Instead, replace the parts we show here. Then install new fuses and fire up the unit. If it blows again, call a pro—you’ve got more serious issues.
A number of other variables can influence your decision on whether to repair or replace your furnace, as well. In addition to cost and brand, consider the expected lifetime of your furnace. If it is more than 15 years old, it might make more sense to invest in a new unit even if it costs more than simply repairing the current problem. Long-term costs also play into the equation. For example, your new furnace may be more energy efficient than the current unit. Even though you will pay more for the actual installation, you might be able to make back your investment through lower energy bills. To make your decision, consult with a reliable professional on what to do. In inspecting your furnace, they will be able to make an informed recommendation that looks not just to the next year, but years into the future. That way, you can make the best possible decision for your home and budget long-term.
Absorption refrigerator Air barrier Air conditioning Antifreeze Automobile air conditioning Autonomous building Building insulation materials Central heating Central solar heating Chilled beam Chilled water Constant air volume (CAV) Coolant Dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) Deep water source cooling Demand-controlled ventilation (DCV) Displacement ventilation District cooling District heating Electric heating Energy recovery ventilation (ERV) Firestop Forced-air Forced-air gas Free cooling Heat recovery ventilation (HRV) Hybrid heat Hydronics HVAC Ice storage air conditioning Kitchen ventilation Mixed-mode ventilation Microgeneration Natural ventilation Passive cooling Passive house Radiant heating and cooling system Radiant cooling Radiant heating Radon mitigation Refrigeration Renewable heat Room air distribution Solar air heat Solar combisystem Solar cooling Solar heating Thermal insulation Underfloor air distribution Underfloor heating Vapor barrier Vapor-compression refrigeration (VCRS) Variable air volume (VAV) Variable refrigerant flow (VRF) Ventilation
In modern buildings, the design, installation, and control systems of these functions are integrated into one or more HVAC systems. For very small buildings, contractors normally estimate the capacity and type of system needed and then design the system, selecting the appropriate refrigerant and various components needed. For larger buildings, building service designers, mechanical engineers, or building services engineers analyze, design, and specify the HVAC systems. Specialty mechanical contractors then fabricate and commission the systems. Building permits and code-compliance inspections of the installations are normally required for all sizes of building.
The manufacture and use of CFCs has been banned or severely restricted due to concerns about ozone depletion (see also Montreal Protocol).[64][65] In light of these environmental concerns, beginning on November 14, 1994, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has restricted the sale, possession and use of refrigerant to only licensed technicians, per rules under sections 608 and 609 of the Clean Air Act.[66]
American design standards are legislated in the Uniform Mechanical Code or International Mechanical Code. In certain states, counties, or cities, either of these codes may be adopted and amended via various legislative processes. These codes are updated and published by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) or the International Code Council (ICC) respectively, on a 3-year code development cycle. Typically, local building permit departments are charged with enforcement of these standards on private and certain public properties.
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