Central, "all-air" air-conditioning systems (or package systems) with a combined outdoor condenser/evaporator unit are often installed in North American residences, offices, and public buildings, but are difficult to retrofit (install in a building that was not designed to receive it) because of the bulky air ducts required. (Minisplit ductless systems are used in these situations.) Outside of North America, packaged systems are only used in limited applications involving large indoor space such as stadiums, theatres or exhibition halls.
Modern Air Solutions provides the skilled and dedicated services to maintain a healthier, more comfortable indoor residential or commercial space, while saving you time and money.  Since first opening our doors in 2007, we’ve built and continue a reputation for a job well done across Aurora, Oswego, Montgomery, Bristol & Plainfield, IL. We’ve assembled a team of licensed, NATE-certified, and factory trained specialists, equipped with the leading-edge tools and technology, to quickly and accurately resolve any challenge.

5) Adjust your thermostat. If you are away for long periods every day, adjust your thermostat to a higher temperature for the time you are away. This will lessen the amount of time your unit has to work each day and will lengthen its life cycle. An additional benefit will be a lower utility bill each month. Some newer thermostats allow you to pre-program your thermostat to match your schedule so that your home will still be cool when you arrive. Optimizing your system’s usage will maximize its life in the long term.
We had an exceptional experience with Gator Air, in particular Carlos. He presented us with quotes for different types of AC units, told us facts about said units and left us to make our decision. No high pressure sales. The installers were professional and cleaned up when they were through. A nice surprise was the 1 year free maintenance of the unit. We belonged to the Gator Club so to not have to pay it for the next year was an added bonus. Thank you GatorAir for making the experience an enjoyable one.
Business Description: Air Patrol AC specilizes in Residential and Commercial comfort systems. All our technicians are factory trained to work on your specific type of heating or cooling. Air Patrol AC offers some of the most comprehensive service plans to keep your AC and Heating units running more efficiently in the peak seasons, thereby saving you money. Keeping your AC and Heating units tuned to their optimal performance not only saves you money on your Gas and Electric bills but stops harmful wear and tear that can cause thousands of dollars worth of damage down the road.

Central home air conditioner service systems consist of two major components: a condensing unit that sits outside your house, and the evaporator coil (often referred to as an A-coil) that sits in the plenum of your furnace or air handler. The refrigerant in the A-coil picks up the heat from your home and moves it to the outdoor condensing unit. The condensing unit fan blows outside air through the condensing coil to remove the heat. The condensing unit houses the three parts replaceable by a DIYer: the contactor, the start/run capacitor(s) and the condenser fan motor. The condensing unit also houses the compressor, but only a pro can replace that. The A-coil has no parts that can be serviced by a DIYer.


The belt should slip right into place. If it seems to be too tight or difficult to set in place, it may be necessary to adjust the motor mount to provide more slack. Then you can re-tighten the tension once the belt is in place. Check the manufacturer’s specifications for proper tension—in most cases, the belt should deflect about an inch when you press down on it.
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The most recognized standards for HVAC design are based on ASHRAE data. The most general of four volumes of the ASHRAE Handbook is Fundamentals; it includes heating and cooling calculations. Each volume of the ASHRAE Handbook is updated every four years. The design professional must consult ASHRAE data for the standards of design and care as the typical building codes provide little to no information on HVAC design practices; codes such as the UMC and IMC do include much detail on installation requirements, however. Other useful reference materials include items from SMACNA, ACGIH, and technical trade journals.
Furnace breakdowns, no cooling when outside temperatures are soaring – heating and cooling repairs often catch us unexpectedly, making HVAC repair costs quite a surprise. Many homeowners worry when calling the HVAC repair contractor because of unexpected costs – your heating and cooling contractor won’t be able to give you a price for the repairs needed until he or she inspects the system to find the source of the problem.

Any forced air system in your home - whether it is powered through electric or gas-generated energy - requires a blower motor. This component consists of an electric motor and fan, and is responsible for pushing air evenly through the furnace. As hvac.com points out, you can easily identify the blower motor in your furnace as the part that looks similar to a hamster wheel at the bottom of the unit. If it stops working, the air needed to heat your home will no longer be pushed through the furnace to be heated and distributed evenly. In that case, you need to inquire about potential repairs. Blower motor repair typically costs between $150 for a simple fix, and $450 for complete replacement and installation of the part. Where you land on that range depends on the exact damage.
Starting to feel the damp Florida Summer Heat? Without understanding the science, you may think putting in a bigger unit will give you more substantial cooling, but a unit that is not properly sized will cost you more and could cause major humidity problems in your home! Where comfort meets efficiency, that is where you’ll find Ferran, your home performance contractor!
Because an air conditioner moves heat between the indoor coil and the outdoor coil, both must be kept clean. This means that, in addition to replacing the air filter at the evaporator coil, it is also necessary to regularly clean the condenser coil. Failure to keep the condenser clean will eventually result in harm to the compressor, because the condenser coil is responsible for discharging both the indoor heat (as picked up by the evaporator) and the heat generated by the electric motor driving the compressor.
Energy efficiency can be improved even more in central heating systems by introducing zoned heating. This allows a more granular application of heat, similar to non-central heating systems. Zones are controlled by multiple thermostats. In water heating systems the thermostats control zone valves, and in forced air systems they control zone dampers inside the vents which selectively block the flow of air. In this case, the control system is very critical to maintaining a proper temperature.
Any concern with your cooling system, however minor, is worth checking out.  NATE-certified technicians can quickly identify the problem and prevent more extensive and costly damage.  Catching defects quickly is the key to cost-effective repairs.  Elevated operational noise such as grinding, screeching, or wheezing is more than aggravating.  Think of those sounds as warning bells.  They’re an indication of component failure.  Listen to what they’re telling you and call for professional assistance.  Worn or misaligned belts are easily repaired.  Strange smells from contaminants such as mold or mildew are best handled before allergens enter breathing air, diminish airflow, and block the coil.  Temperature swings, unstable humidity, or extended run times are all signs of bigger problems on the way.  Call Ferran Services at 407-422-3551 (Orlando) or 386-322-6168 (Volusia), and our licensed technicians will perform a complete system check, ensuring safe, efficient and reliable operation.
A number of other variables can influence your decision on whether to repair or replace your furnace, as well. In addition to cost and brand, consider the expected lifetime of your furnace. If it is more than 15 years old, it might make more sense to invest in a new unit even if it costs more than simply repairing the current problem. Long-term costs also play into the equation. For example, your new furnace may be more energy efficient than the current unit. Even though you will pay more for the actual installation, you might be able to make back your investment through lower energy bills. To make your decision, consult with a reliable professional on what to do. In inspecting your furnace, they will be able to make an informed recommendation that looks not just to the next year, but years into the future. That way, you can make the best possible decision for your home and budget long-term.
Air conditioner inverter Air door Air filter Air handler Air ionizer Air-mixing plenum Air purifier Air source heat pumps Automatic balancing valve Back boiler Barrier pipe Blast damper Boiler Centrifugal fan Ceramic heater Chiller Condensate pump Condenser Condensing boiler Convection heater Cooling tower Damper Dehumidifier Duct Economizer Electrostatic precipitator Evaporative cooler Evaporator Exhaust hood Expansion tank Fan coil unit Fan heater Fire damper Fireplace Fireplace insert Freeze stat Flue Freon Fume hood Furnace Furnace room Gas compressor Gas heater Gasoline heater Geothermal heat pump Grease duct Grille Ground-coupled heat exchanger Heat exchanger Heat pipe Heat pump Heating film Heating system High efficiency glandless circulating pump High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) High pressure cut off switch Humidifier Infrared heater Inverter compressor Kerosene heater Louver Mechanical fan Mechanical room Oil heater Packaged terminal air conditioner Plenum space Pressurisation ductwork Process duct work Radiator Radiator reflector Recuperator Refrigerant Register Reversing valve Run-around coil Scroll compressor Solar chimney Solar-assisted heat pump Space heater Smoke exhaust ductwork Thermal expansion valve Thermal wheel Thermosiphon Thermostatic radiator valve Trickle vent Trombe wall Turning vanes Ultra-low particulate air (ULPA) Whole-house fan Windcatcher Wood-burning stove
A multi-split system[44] is a conventional split system, which is divided into two parts (evaporator and condenser) and allows cooling or heating of several rooms with one external unit. In the outdoor unit of this air conditioner there is a more powerful compressor, ports for connecting several traces and automation with locking valves for regulating the volume of refrigerant supplied to the indoor units located in the room.
A programmable thermostat is a must-have in today’s state of AC technology. Programmable thermostats allow you to set temperatures for various times throughout the day and automatically lower the temperature when you most need it to help you save money and manage your cooling without constantly hovering over the dial. In this article, we’ll walk you through installing a programmable thermostat in your home.
The condensed, pressurized, and still usually somewhat hot liquid refrigerant is next routed through an expansion valve (often nothing more than a pinhole in the system's copper tubing) where it undergoes an abrupt reduction in pressure. That pressure reduction results in flash evaporation of a part of the liquid refrigerant, greatly lowering its temperature. The cold refrigerant is then routed through the evaporator. A fan blows the interior warm air (which is to be cooled) across the evaporator, causing the liquid part of the cold refrigerant mixture to evaporate as well, further lowering the temperature. The warm air is therefore cooled and is pumped by an exhaust fan/ blower into the room. To complete the refrigeration cycle, the refrigerant vapor is routed back into the compressor. In order for the process to have any efficiency, the cooling/evaporative portion of the system must be separated by some kind of physical barrier from the heating/condensing portion, and each portion must have its own fan to circulate its own "kind" of air (either the hot air or the cool air).
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