Finally, don't underestimate the thermostat as a potential reason why your furnace is not working. Everything on the heating unit itself may function perfectly, but your home still will not heat right if the console you use to set the temperature doesn't communicate your input. A faulty thermostat can either be due to the wall unit itself, or the wiring that connects it to your furnace. Average thermostat repair costs are between $108 and $282, including labor. Replacement costs, of course, depend on the thermostat you choose. Visit our thermostat repair cost guide to learn more about this type of issue.
Talk to your HVAC repair contractor about options to make HVAC repair costs more affordable. Many contractors offer financing options to assist customers in this very position, as well as payment plans. HVAC companies know HVAC repair costs can come as quite a shock in some scenarios, and want to help you get the repairs your system needs to preserve your comfort and safety.
When your gas furnace isn’t blowing hot air, the issue could be due to a faulty pilot light or broken ignitor. Remove the furnace cover panel and visually inspect whether you can see a flame from the pilot light. A natural gas furnace will be blue and yellow in color, and a propane furnace should have a bluish green flame with a yellow tip. If you can see a flame and it appears normal, the issue could be related to the furnace blower motor or other complex furnace parts. If the flame appears low or non-existent, it’s best to contact an experienced furnace repair company. Remember to never touch any open wires; contact a professional.

At times, malfunctions strike without warning.  These problems rarely stick to regular business hours.  When your comfort, safety, and well-being is at stake, don’t wait for Monday morning.  The service team from Ferran Services is available 24/7 to provide the prompt and dependable assistance you require.  Fully-stocked service trucks and extensively trained technicians allow us to handle the majority of repair requirements in a single visit.  We work on all makes and models, and our technicians do not rely on commission.  We never take advantage of your desperate situation, never sell you a product or service you don’t need, and always keep you informed.  By relying on Factory Authorized Parts, we restore system efficiency, sound levels, and longevity.

Without proper ventilation, carbon monoxide can be lethal at concentrations of 1000 ppm (0.1%). However, at several hundred ppm, carbon monoxide exposure induces headaches, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. Carbon monoxide binds with hemoglobin in the blood, forming carboxyhemoglobin, reducing the blood's ability to transport oxygen. The primary health concerns associated with carbon monoxide exposure are its cardiovascular and neurobehavioral effects. Carbon monoxide can cause atherosclerosis (the hardening of arteries) and can also trigger heart attacks. Neurologically, carbon monoxide exposure reduces hand to eye coordination, vigilance, and continuous performance. It can also affect time discrimination.[15]
Reinstall the access panel and disconnect block. Turn on the circuit breaker and furnace switch. Then set the thermostat to a lower temperature and wait for the AC to start (see “Be Patient at Startup,” below). The compressor should run and the condenser fan should spin. If the compressor starts but the fan doesn’t, the fan motor is most likely shot. Shut off the power and remove the screws around the condenser cover. Lift the cover and remove the fan blade and motor (photo 7). Reinstall the blade and secure the cover. Then repower the unit and see if the fan starts. If it doesn’t, you’ve given it your best shot—it’s time to call a pro.

In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]

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