We are open from 7am to 10pm every weekday and from 7am to 8pm on weekends. We book appointments in a 2 hour arrival window and call 30-45 mins before we arrive so you do not have to sit around waiting. It is often possible to schedule your appointment in the evening or morning hours to avoid conflicting with your work schedule. Are you looking for service today? Give us a call or click on one of the Schedule Service buttons found on the top and left sides of this page to contact us today.
The performance of vapor compression refrigeration cycles[27] is limited by thermodynamics. These air conditioning and heat pump devices move heat rather than convert it from one form to another, so thermal efficiencies do not appropriately describe the performance of these devices. The Coefficient-of-Performance (COP) measures performance, but this dimensionless measure has not been adopted. Instead, the Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) has traditionally been used to characterize the performance of many HVAC systems. EER is the Energy Efficiency Ratio based on a 35 °C (95 °F) outdoor temperature. To more accurately describe the performance of air conditioning equipment over a typical cooling season a modified version of the EER, the Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER), or in Europe the ESEER, is used. SEER ratings are based on seasonal temperature averages instead of a constant 35 °C (95 °F) outdoor temperature. The current industry minimum SEER rating is 14 SEER.[28]
Most central air conditioners have two basic parts: an outdoor unit (compressor/condenser) that sits next to your home and an indoor unit (evaporator) that’s located in a central duct near your furnace. If you have a heat pump instead of a furnace, the indoor unit will be in the air handler. Use the same maintenance steps we show here. If your furnace looks different from the one shown or you have a heat pump, use the owner’s manual to find your way around it. The basic parts will be the same. Check out our step-by-step guide for deep-cleaning your home air conditioner.
Has another company told you that your furnace has a cracked heat exchanger?  The heat exchanger is the heart of your furnace. Its failure can result in a dangerous situation for your home and the best solution is usually a new furnace.  Because of these issues, Bonney takes this situation very seriously.  We will offer you proof of the cracked heat exchanger in the form of a picture from our video inspection camera or a report from our exhaust gas analyzer, before we make our recommendation.
Because an air conditioner moves heat between the indoor coil and the outdoor coil, both must be kept clean. This means that, in addition to replacing the air filter at the evaporator coil, it is also necessary to regularly clean the condenser coil. Failure to keep the condenser clean will eventually result in harm to the compressor, because the condenser coil is responsible for discharging both the indoor heat (as picked up by the evaporator) and the heat generated by the electric motor driving the compressor.
5) Adjust your thermostat. If you are away for long periods every day, adjust your thermostat to a higher temperature for the time you are away. This will lessen the amount of time your unit has to work each day and will lengthen its life cycle. An additional benefit will be a lower utility bill each month. Some newer thermostats allow you to pre-program your thermostat to match your schedule so that your home will still be cool when you arrive. Optimizing your system’s usage will maximize its life in the long term.
Modern Air Solutions provides the skilled and dedicated services to maintain a healthier, more comfortable indoor residential or commercial space, while saving you time and money.  Since first opening our doors in 2007, we’ve built and continue a reputation for a job well done across Aurora, Oswego, Montgomery, Bristol & Plainfield, IL. We’ve assembled a team of licensed, NATE-certified, and factory trained specialists, equipped with the leading-edge tools and technology, to quickly and accurately resolve any challenge.
In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]
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