As a Carrier Factory Authorized Dealer, we are qualified in the most widely recognized and innovative selection of heating, cooling, and air quality options to satisfy any demand. From new installation and retrofit projects, to seasonal maintenance and repair, Modern Air Solutions optimizes the performance of equipment, targeting energy efficiency, reliability, and longevity.
When you establish routine visits with Vredevoogd Heating & Cooling Grand Rapids MI, you can enhance the longevity of your HVAC system with our custom care. Our technicians are skilled at performing comprehensive inspections. We routinely spot small issues before they can turn into major repairs. By optimally maintaining your system, we can extend its life and ensure that it reliably meets your household’s heating and cooling needs. You can also join our Comfort Club! You can schedule routine appointments to service your system before the hot and cold seasons. If you discover a problem afterward, call us to provide you with immediate service. We can troubleshoot the problem in no time. We’ll give you an upfront estimate concerning cost, parts, and labor. There’s no guessing when it comes to our service and costs. Our techs will provide you with everything you need to know about their service from beginning to end of the job. We even have Financing Available.

Our fully trained and certified heating technicians have been repairing installing furnaces, heating systems and heat pumps in Smyrna and the Atlanta area since 1966.  We offer 24 hour emergency service for unexpected heating system break downs.  We can provide expert maintenance and repair on your current heating system or help you select a new, high-efficiency heating system from our wide range of furnaces.
You might guess it from the name: the heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually heats the air your blower motor pushes through the furnace. It consists of a chamber in which the heat energy produced by natural or propane gas is transferred to the forced air. At the same time, this part also includes a vent through which the gases themselves are safely removed from the unit and the air that enters your home. Because of these gases, a problem with your heat exchanger needs to be dealt with promptly. Over time, cracks in the exchanger can result in carbon monoxide leaks. Taking care of the problem once again means understanding the existence of a range: repairing your heat exchanger can cost as little as $100, but a full replacement may cost up to $1,200.
5) Adjust your thermostat. If you are away for long periods every day, adjust your thermostat to a higher temperature for the time you are away. This will lessen the amount of time your unit has to work each day and will lengthen its life cycle. An additional benefit will be a lower utility bill each month. Some newer thermostats allow you to pre-program your thermostat to match your schedule so that your home will still be cool when you arrive. Optimizing your system’s usage will maximize its life in the long term.
1) Your air conditioner is not working at all. Before calling in a professional to address this issue, you may want to check a few things yourself. Check to see if your thermostat is set to “cool”. Confirm that your designated cooling temperature is less than the temperature of the room or home. If everything is set correctly, check the electrical panel to be sure you do not have a tripped breaker. If these things all check out and your air condition unit is still not working, it is time to call in a professional.
This type of furnace is fueled by liquid propane gas, which is burned to push hot air through your home. A pilot light ignites the burners within a combustion chamber, which push heat into the heat exchanger and eventually through your entire home. Repairing this type of furnace can be more expensive than its electric alternative. For example here are some common propane gas repairs and their costs:
Without proper ventilation, carbon monoxide can be lethal at concentrations of 1000 ppm (0.1%). However, at several hundred ppm, carbon monoxide exposure induces headaches, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. Carbon monoxide binds with hemoglobin in the blood, forming carboxyhemoglobin, reducing the blood's ability to transport oxygen. The primary health concerns associated with carbon monoxide exposure are its cardiovascular and neurobehavioral effects. Carbon monoxide can cause atherosclerosis (the hardening of arteries) and can also trigger heart attacks. Neurologically, carbon monoxide exposure reduces hand to eye coordination, vigilance, and continuous performance. It can also affect time discrimination.[15]
Air conditioning (often referred to as AC, A/C, or air con)[1] is the process of removing heat and moisture from the interior of an occupied space, to improve the comfort of occupants. Air conditioning can be used in both domestic and commercial environments. This process is most commonly used to achieve a more comfortable interior environment, typically for humans and other animals; however, air conditioning is also used to cool/dehumidify rooms filled with heat-producing electronic devices, such as computer servers, power amplifiers, and even to display and store some delicate products, such as artwork.
Clean air delivery rate is the amount of clean air an air cleaner provides to a room or space. When determining CADR, the amount of airflow in a space is taken into account. For example, an air cleaner with a flow rate of 100 cfm (cubic feet per minute) and an efficiency of 50% has a CADR of 50 cfm. Along with CADR, filtration performance is very important when it comes to the air in our indoor environment. Filter performance depends on the size of the particle or fiber, the filter packing density and depth and also the air flow rate.[31] 

In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]
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