Our furnace quit lighting yesterday. I called Cool Tech around 7pm and they offered to come out after hours, but I chose to set up an appointment today. The technician John called me at 7:30am and was there about 8am as promised. He was very courteous and replaced the igniter quickly. The heater is back to working properly. This is my second time hiring Cool Tech and they will continue to be my go-to heating and air conditioning guys.
Leave gambling to the casinos! When it’s 110 degrees in the shade, you don’t want take a chance with a broken AC. Go beyond a tune-up and Rejuuuvenate! your air conditioner back to factory fresh conditions. Your AC shouldn’t sound like a slot machine, so we believe in eliminating every squeak, rattle and hum because if you don’t, bigger problems will come. So trust our highly trained, screened, and “Sadie Certified” technicians to make you the coolest act on the Strip!
If your furnace’s motor runs but the blower doesn’t move air, the belt that connects the two probably has broken. Replacing it is an easy fix. First, turn off all power to the unit and turn off the gas at the gas valve that serves the furnace. Remove the door on the front of the furnace cabinet to give you access to the blower (it might be on a slide-out drawer.) Check the number stamped on the belt and get an exact replacement from a home center or heating supply outlet.
If the condenser coils are clogged, the compressor can overheat and shut down. You’ll experience intermittent periods of minimal cooling, followed by no cooling. Even if you’re “sure” the condenser coils are clean, clean them again. Turn off the power. Flip the air conditioning service and furnace circuit breakers in your main electrical panel to the “Off” position. Next, turn off the power switch right at the furnace or air handler. Then yank the disconnect block (Photo 1) and clean the condenser coils (Photo 2). If the air conditioning service still doesn’t work properly after you’ve cleaned the condenser coils, installed a new filter and opened all the supply vents, proceed with the following repairs.

Air changes per hour Bake-out Building envelope Convection Dilution Domestic energy consumption Enthalpy Fluid dynamics Gas compressor Heat pump and refrigeration cycle Heat transfer Humidity Infiltration Latent heat Noise control Outgassing Particulates Psychrometrics Sensible heat Stack effect Thermal comfort Thermal destratification Thermal mass Thermodynamics Vapour pressure of water
If you hear clicking that is followed by a hum or buzz, you’re probably hearing the fan motor attempting to start without the boost it needs from the capacitor. You can almost always conclude that the capacitor has failed. Sometimes you can get the compressor fan spinning (clockwise) by pushing it with a thin stick or long screwdriver poked through the grille. But the chances are good that this might work for one cycle, but the capacitor will fail next time the AC goes on. It’s best to replace the capacitor.

Although your AC may continue to work for a time, if you ignore warning signs of air conditioner repair troubles, it can be much more costly to repair in the long term. Diminished cooling capacity not only makes your home uncomfortably warm, but it also raises your utility bills significantly as your unit struggles to maintain the desired temperature ineffectively. A system put under strain is likely to overheat, resulting in major damage. Therefore, it is best to have your air conditioner repaired promptly when you discover signs of trouble. 
The selection of indoor units has one restriction: their total power should not exceed the capacity of the outdoor unit. In practice, however, it is very common to see a multi-split system with a total capacity of indoor units greater than the outdoor capacity by at least 20%. However, it is wrong to expect better performance when all indoor units are turned on at the same time, since the total capacity of the whole system is limited by the capacity of the outdoor unit. Simply put, the outdoor unit will distribute all its power to all operating indoor units in such a way that some of the rooms may not have a very comfortable temperature level. However, the calculation of the total power is not simple, since it takes into account not only the nominal power of the units, but also the cooling capacity, heating, dehumidification, humidification, venting, etc.
Given the broad price ranges above, it's easy to recognize that the cost of your furnace repair varies drastically based on which parts need attention. As a result, it makes sense to gain a better understanding of the parts that heat your home, and how much they cost to repair. Repairing or replacing your furnace’s blower motor can cost you anywhere between $150 and $450, depending on the extent of the damage. Heat exchanger repair costs can vary greatly, from as little as $100 for a simple fix to as much as $1,200 for a full replacement. Repairing a furnace igniter will only cost you $300 at most, while flame sensor repairs generally fall between $80 to $250. The average cost to repair your Thermostat will range from $108 to $282.
Before opening the electrical cover on the A/C unit, be sure to shut off all power to the compressor unit and the indoor furnace or air handler, and verify that it is off. Note that this may mean shutting off a circuit breaker that serves the furnace and air handler, and then, near the compressor, pulling out the disconnect block (or shutting off the 220-volt power) to the outdoor compressor.
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