Dehumidification (air drying) in an air conditioning system is provided by the evaporator. Since the evaporator operates at a temperature below the dew point, moisture in the air condenses on the evaporator coil tubes. This moisture is collected at the bottom of the evaporator in a pan and removed by piping to a central drain or onto the ground outside.
As touched on by their name, heat pumps function by transferring heat energy indoors during the winter and outdoors from your home during the summer. They're often attached to air conditioning units, using the surrounding air to transfer energy. However, geothermal heat pumps and water source heat pumps are also available. The cost to repair a heat pump, again, depends on the specific problem. Replacing a faulty thermostat may cost up to $300 including labor, while a worn or damaged defrost control board can set you back up to $600. For more details on your potential repair costs using this heating source, visit our heat pump repair cost guide.
The thermocouple is a copper rod that the pilot flame heats-up. When it gets hot enough, the thermocouple signals that there is enough heat to burn the gas fuel being released into the appliance—and so it allows the gas to be released to the burners. In some cases where the pilot light won’t stay lit, the thermocouple needs to be adjusted or replaced. This is generally a job for a professional.
Precision’s technicians are all NATE certified. This is the highest certification in the air conditioning industry. With that, we can take pride in saying that we provide the best AC repair Phoenix residents can get. Our technicians are thoroughly screened and tested before they begin work on your home. Our AC technicians provide top-notch Phoenix air conditioning repair, and proof of that is their ability to repair most every brand of HVAC equipment. These brands include Trane, Bryant, Ruud, Goodman, Amana, Precision, Armstrong, Carrier, Coleman, Honeywell, Janitrol, Lennox, Payne, Rheem, York, Goettl, American Standard along with many more.

As a technical industry, the heating and cooling field is associated with annual advances. New energies make our industry an exciting place to work. Our team thrives on keeping up to date with all changes in the HVAC field. We are here to share our knowledge with each customer. When you are ready to update your HVAC system, we can help you select the ideal system for your home.
Most central air conditioners are connected to a home's forced-air distribution system. Thus, the same motor, blower, and ductwork used for heating are used to distribute cool air from the air conditioning system. When a central air conditioner is operating, hot air inside the house flows to the furnace through the return-air duct. The hot air is moved by the blower across the cooled evaporator coil in the plenum and is then delivered through ducts to cool the house. When the air conditioner works but the house doesn't cool, the problem is probably in the distribution system.
Please give us a call today at 1-800-948-MIKE (6453) for first-class air conditioning service and repairs in the Springfield, VA, Rockville, Silver Spring, MD & Washington D.C. metro area. We’re open seven days a week and provide 24/7 emergency service. For those who want to ensure that their AC unit is in working order before the summer season begins – or at any other time – we proudly offer a Heating & Cooling precision tune up to troubleshoot any potential AC problems. Upon completion of the AC inspection, we will provide you with a comprehensive written report regarding your Air Conditioning and Heating system’s status and make any recommendations necessary to improve your comfort level and head off any problems before they arise.
In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]
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