When your gas furnace isn’t blowing hot air, the issue could be due to a faulty pilot light or broken ignitor. Remove the furnace cover panel and visually inspect whether you can see a flame from the pilot light. A natural gas furnace will be blue and yellow in color, and a propane furnace should have a bluish green flame with a yellow tip. If you can see a flame and it appears normal, the issue could be related to the furnace blower motor or other complex furnace parts. If the flame appears low or non-existent, it’s best to contact an experienced furnace repair company. Remember to never touch any open wires; contact a professional.

Starting to feel the damp Florida Summer Heat? Without understanding the science, you may think putting in a bigger unit will give you more substantial cooling, but a unit that is not properly sized will cost you more and could cause major humidity problems in your home! Where comfort meets efficiency, that is where you’ll find Ferran, your home performance contractor!
Moisture around or near your system—It’s possible that water pools next to your AC unit may just be caused by a blocked drain tube. A refrigerant leak, however, could be the reason for the excessive moisture, and leaking refrigerant can cause harm to the unit, humans, and the environment. Only technicians that provide the best air conditioner repair Phoenix has to offer are qualified to deal with refrigerant leaks.
In 1992, a non-governmental organization, Greenpeace, was spurred by corporate executive policies and requested that a European lab find substitute refrigerants. This led to two alternatives, one a blend of propane (R290) and isobutane (R600a), and one of pure isobutane.[18][22] Industry resisted change in Europe until 1993, and in the U.S. until 2011, despite some supportive steps in 2004 and 2008 (see Refrigerant Development above).[27][68]
Air conditioner equipment power in the U.S. is often described in terms of "tons of refrigeration", with each approximately equal to the cooling power of one short ton (2000 pounds or 907 kilograms) of ice melting in a 24-hour period. The value is defined as 12,000 BTU per hour, or 3517 watts.[32] Residential central air systems are usually from 1 to 5 tons (3.5 to 18 kW) in capacity.
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