Central home air conditioner service systems consist of two major components: a condensing unit that sits outside your house, and the evaporator coil (often referred to as an A-coil) that sits in the plenum of your furnace or air handler. The refrigerant in the A-coil picks up the heat from your home and moves it to the outdoor condensing unit. The condensing unit fan blows outside air through the condensing coil to remove the heat. The condensing unit houses the three parts replaceable by a DIYer: the contactor, the start/run capacitor(s) and the condenser fan motor. The condensing unit also houses the compressor, but only a pro can replace that. The A-coil has no parts that can be serviced by a DIYer.

I don’t normally rate a company 5 stars, because nobody is perfect, but these guys did a wonderful job. Carlos their sales person was knowledgeable and courteous. The office staff was extremely helpful and very friendly and the installers were on time and did a great job. Even the county inspector said, “Wow, these guys did a great job!” That’s the first time I’ve ever heard an inspector give his personal opinion on a job. I’m sixty one and I’ve had to have a lot of systems replace over the years. Well done everyone at Gator Air. Your the best! If your looking to replace your AC system, look no further.
Ventilation is the process of changing or replacing air in any space to control temperature or remove any combination of moisture, odors, smoke, heat, dust, airborne bacteria, or carbon dioxide, and to replenish oxygen. Ventilation includes both the exchange of air with the outside as well as circulation of air within the building. It is one of the most important factors for maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in buildings. Methods for ventilating a building may be divided into mechanical/forced and natural types.[16]
Finally, don't underestimate the thermostat as a potential reason why your furnace is not working. Everything on the heating unit itself may function perfectly, but your home still will not heat right if the console you use to set the temperature doesn't communicate your input. A faulty thermostat can either be due to the wall unit itself, or the wiring that connects it to your furnace. Average thermostat repair costs are between $108 and $282, including labor. Replacement costs, of course, depend on the thermostat you choose. Visit our thermostat repair cost guide to learn more about this type of issue.
If your furnace is more than 15 years old or broken beyond repair, furnace replacement is necessary. Old furnaces are very inefficient which means that you could be spending more on your gas or electric bill than you need to. Old furnaces can also be very hazardous to your health and home. Furnaces are basically controlled fires, and when the control systems on your furnace are out of date or malfunctioning, the safety of your home is in jeopardy. If you have an old or malfunctioning furnace, or if you want a safety check on your current system, then give our furnace replacement company a call today!
If you’re looking to maintain, replace, or repair your home or business’s air conditioning system, “Make the Precision Decision”™ and give us a call. We are available 24/7 for all your emergency service needs. Our service area includes Litchfield Park, Mesa, Avondale, Peoria, Phoenix, Chandler, Scottsdale, Sun Lakes, Gilbert, Surprise, Glendale, Tempe, Goodyear and surrounding areas.
When central air conditioning service fails during a heat spell, you may have to wait days for an HVAC repair technician or a ac contractor to show up, and you’ll probably pay at least several hundred for the repair. But if you’re comfortable working around electricity and are willing to spend about $50 on parts, you can probably repair your air conditioning service yourself in about two hours and save about $225 on parts markup and labor.
We had an exceptional experience with Gator Air, in particular Carlos. He presented us with quotes for different types of AC units, told us facts about said units and left us to make our decision. No high pressure sales. The installers were professional and cleaned up when they were through. A nice surprise was the 1 year free maintenance of the unit. We belonged to the Gator Club so to not have to pay it for the next year was an added bonus. Thank you GatorAir for making the experience an enjoyable one.
Any concern with your cooling system, however minor, is worth checking out.  NATE-certified technicians can quickly identify the problem and prevent more extensive and costly damage.  Catching defects quickly is the key to cost-effective repairs.  Elevated operational noise such as grinding, screeching, or wheezing is more than aggravating.  Think of those sounds as warning bells.  They’re an indication of component failure.  Listen to what they’re telling you and call for professional assistance.  Worn or misaligned belts are easily repaired.  Strange smells from contaminants such as mold or mildew are best handled before allergens enter breathing air, diminish airflow, and block the coil.  Temperature swings, unstable humidity, or extended run times are all signs of bigger problems on the way.  Call Ferran Services at 407-422-3551 (Orlando) or 386-322-6168 (Volusia), and our licensed technicians will perform a complete system check, ensuring safe, efficient and reliable operation.
The summers here in Alexandria can range from almost pleasant to downright brutal. And you know as well as we do that it’s those latter days when your central AC or heat pump will decide to go down! But you don’t have to seek solace at the Waterfront or over at Cameron Run Regional Park. The secret to restoring your comfort lies with the certified specialists at HVAC & Plumbing Unlimited!

Although HVAC is executed in individual buildings or other enclosed spaces (like NORAD's underground headquarters), the equipment involved is in some cases an extension of a larger district heating (DH) or district cooling (DC) network, or a combined DHC network. In such cases, the operating and maintenance aspects are simplified and metering becomes necessary to bill for the energy that is consumed, and in some cases energy that is returned to the larger system. For example, at a given time one building may be utilizing chilled water for air conditioning and the warm water it returns may be used in another building for heating, or for the overall heating-portion of the DHC network (likely with energy added to boost the temperature).[4][5][6]


Even with the best air conditioning repair service Phoenix can offer, an AC unit that has reached the end of its shelf life must be replaced. If you are ready to upgrade or replace that aging system, call us now for a free estimate, or check out our AC Unit Replacement section. In addition to offering our own Precision Line with the best warranty available in the industry, we also partner with industry leaders to offer the highest quality equipment at the best possible price, and we personally stand behind all of our new equipment installations.

There was an unidentified beeping sound which I thought was coming from my indoor HVAC unit. The technician patiently spoke to me over the phone and we discovered that it was not the HVAC that was making the noise. The technician was extraordinarily helpful and polite as we spoke and he saved me a few hundred dollars since he helped me over the phone and didn't have to make an emergency visit. HVAC Unlimited is our "go to" company for all our heating and cooling needs!
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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