American design standards are legislated in the Uniform Mechanical Code or International Mechanical Code. In certain states, counties, or cities, either of these codes may be adopted and amended via various legislative processes. These codes are updated and published by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) or the International Code Council (ICC) respectively, on a 3-year code development cycle. Typically, local building permit departments are charged with enforcement of these standards on private and certain public properties.
When the time comes to schedule furnace repairs, you want a team you can trust. Keeping your home warm and comfortable is important for you and your family, which is why you should rely on the highly-trained team of technicians at Horizon Services. Our techs undergo at least 150 hours of technical training every year and are up-to-date on the latest, most advanced techniques in the trade. We also background-check all of our employees to ensure your complete comfort and safety. When you call on us for furnace repair, we will arrive on-time and on schedule, ready to resolve the issue as quickly as possible.

At Horizon Services, we strive to provide all of our customers with the peace of mind that comes from knowing that you have a skilled team on-call for any AC emergencies that may arise. We have more than 300 fully stocked trucks ready to go at a moment's notice. Our Horizon technicians undergo rigorous training, including a mandatory 150 hours of training every year, to ensure that they're always up to date on the latest techniques and HVAC technology. Plus, we perform extensive background checks, including drug and criminal checks, on all of our employees so you don't have to worry about letting a stranger into your home when your AC breaks down in the middle of the night. When you're dealing with an air conditioning emergency, trust the experts at Horizon Services!
Your HVAC professional can also help you verify that your system is properly matched by providing you with an AHRI Certificate of Certified Product Performance upon request. The certificate verifies that the outdoor unit (condenser) and the indoor unit (evaporator) combination has been certified as a matched system by the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI). For higher efficiency systems, this certification may help you obtain a rebate from your utility or local municipality if you have to replace your unit in whole or in part. Not all areas offer a rebate, but your technician will likely be able to provide information about the certification process. Fees for performing this certification vary, but generally are relatively inexpensive.
Whole-house fans have helped cool homes for a century. The basic design is simple: An attic-mounted fan pushes hot air out through attic vents and draws cooler, outside air in through open doors and windows. This rapid air exchange—large fans can purge a house of hot air in two to three minutes—not only removes built-up heat but also creates a pleasant breeze.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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