Nobody wants to deal with a broken furnace in winter. Lucky for you, our Denver furnace repair specialists are available 7 days a week. Don’t face cold winter nights without a well functioning furnace. Contact us, your Denver furnace repair company so that we can diagnose the problem and set you up with a preventative maintenance package so we can catch problems before they occur. Click HERE to learn more about our furnace related services.
There is nothing worse than having your air conditioner break in the middle of a long, hot summer. You can ensure your air conditioning unit stays in working order all year long with regular service. Sometimes, however, repairs are necessary whether it’s fixing the evaporator, capacitor, or condenser or recharging the refrigerant. Most air conditioner repairs cost between $163 and $533 with most homeowners reporting that they spend about $347. If you do need a repair, here is some information to help you get it done quickly, professionally, and economically.
Some systems include an "economizer mode", which is sometimes called a "free-cooling mode". When economizing, the control system will open (fully or partially) the outside air damper and close (fully or partially) the return air damper. This will cause fresh, outside air to be supplied to the system. When the outside air is cooler than the demanded cool air, this will allow the demand to be met without using the mechanical supply of cooling (typically chilled water or a direct expansion "DX" unit), thus saving energy. The control system can compare the temperature of the outside air vs. return air, or it can compare the enthalpy of the air, as is frequently done in climates where humidity is more of an issue. In both cases, the outside air must be less energetic than the return air for the system to enter the economizer mode.
Free cooling systems can have very high efficiencies, and are sometimes combined with seasonal thermal energy storage so that the cold of winter can be used for summer air conditioning. Common storage mediums are deep aquifers or a natural underground rock mass accessed via a cluster of small-diameter, heat-exchanger-equipped boreholes. Some systems with small storages are hybrids, using free cooling early in the cooling season, and later employing a heat pump to chill the circulation coming from the storage. The heat pump is added-in because the storage acts as a heat sink when the system is in cooling (as opposed to charging) mode, causing the temperature to gradually increase during the cooling season.

Air conditioning (often referred to as AC, A/C, or air con)[1] is the process of removing heat and moisture from the interior of an occupied space, to improve the comfort of occupants. Air conditioning can be used in both domestic and commercial environments. This process is most commonly used to achieve a more comfortable interior environment, typically for humans and other animals; however, air conditioning is also used to cool/dehumidify rooms filled with heat-producing electronic devices, such as computer servers, power amplifiers, and even to display and store some delicate products, such as artwork.
Its unique feature is the presence of one main external unit that connected to several indoor units. Such systems might be the right solution for maintaining the microclimate in several offices, shops, large living spaces. Just few of outdoor units do not worsen the aesthetic appearance of the building.The main external unit can be connected to several different indoor types: floor, ceiling, cassette, etc.
Has another company told you that your furnace has a cracked heat exchanger?  The heat exchanger is the heart of your furnace. Its failure can result in a dangerous situation for your home and the best solution is usually a new furnace.  Because of these issues, Bonney takes this situation very seriously.  We will offer you proof of the cracked heat exchanger in the form of a picture from our video inspection camera or a report from our exhaust gas analyzer, before we make our recommendation.
If the AC doesn’t turn off, it may be time to clean the condensing unit. Dirty condenser coils won’t give off heat efficiently and will keep the unit running.  Another possibility: The contacts on the outdoor run relay may have welded together—something that can happen over time because of frequent electrical arcing at the relay. Before checking the run relay, turn off the power to the furnace and the condensing unit. Next, disassemble the relay and pry apart the contacts. This should do the trick until you buy a replacement—which you should do soon.

AC units and thermostats have built-in delay features when they’re shut down and then repowered. The delay can be as long as 10 minutes. And, if you’ve subscribed to an energy-saving device from your local power utility, the unit can take even longer to reset. If you’ve installed the parts shown and reinstalled the disconnect block, repowered the circuit breaker, turned on the switch at the furnace, moved the thermostat to AC mode and lowered the temperature below the indoor temperature, and the unit doesn’t fire up after 30 minutes, it’s time to call a pro.
We want to compliment your fine sales and installation team. They are outstanding. Carlos, your sales rep., was highly informative. We reviewed our needs and we ultimately chose the Trane XV-18 variable speed system. Carlos did not try to up sell us with things that we did not need but he did help us choose the correct upgraded filter and UV light that we wanted. We told Carlos that our research indicated that the quality of the installation of the unit was at least as important as the unit itself, and Carlos agreed. Carlos pointed out that new proper sized duct work and copper wiring would be required for a correct installation, and that we needed to add two more returns. We asked if more returns were needed and Carlos said that would not be cost effective. That was great to hear. Carlos assured us that the installation team of Willie and Gary, both lead installers, would be used. They were both superb. They came on time and worked for 12 and 1/2 hours. It was a 93 degree day so the heat in the attic was intense. We kept telling them to take a break but they continued to work up there in what must have been 130+ temperatures. They were amazing! They were neat and cleaned up any mess they made. They patiently answered all of our many questions and gave us helpful tips. They were truly professional in all respects. We also note that Stacy, Angie and Karen of your office staff were each courteous, accommodating and efficient. They helped things to go smoothly. Carlos, Gary, Stacy, Angie, Willie and Karen are each great assets to your company. We would be comfortable recommending that team of people to anyone! Ken and Kathy Luban
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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